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From Mexico to Texas to Cambridge

From Mexico to Texas to Cambridge

October 30, 2014

As they visited Mexico and Texas, Harvard President Drew Faust and Vice Provost for International Affairs Jorge I. Domínguez reinforced the University’s deep and longstanding ties there, met with alumni and faculty, and, in Dallas, promoted the continued value of higher education.

Highlighting Harvard’s scholarship in Mexico, Faust toured the archaeological digs at Teotihuacan, a nearly 2,000-year-old temple complex outside Mexico City, with Bill Fash, the Charles P. Bowditch Professor of Central American and Mexican Archaeology and Ethnology, whose work has helped alter...

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Harvard’s ‘haunted’ Houses

Harvard’s ‘haunted’ Houses

October 29, 2014

Clark Schuler finds it funny to tell the story of the Wadsworth House ghost, and not just around Halloween.

“If weird experiences come up in conversations,” said the IT specialist, “or if someone new starts, I like to add my two cents about it.”

Schuler has been at Harvard for more than 20 years, and his work with computers has carried him across the campus. But that night in Wadsworth resonates.

“It was late, maybe 8 or 9 o’clock, wintertime. I was the only one in the building, in the downstairs offices, with the door right behind me,” recalled Schuler. “But...

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Forgotten Jewish fighters

Forgotten Jewish fighters

October 28, 2014

Klara Grigorievna Rinkina is 91 years old and lives near Boston. She is 5 feet tall, with silver hair and a pleasant, round face. Rinkina is also a war hero, having served as a Red Army medic during what Russians still call the Great Patriotic War. On special occasions she wears a sweater pinned from neck to waist with medals.

One of those special occasions came this month, during an exhibit opening at Pusey Library. Rinkina and five fellow veterans were there — all Jews, whose presence in the Red Army is a...

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Status shift for whale pelvic bones

Status shift for whale pelvic bones

October 28, 2014

For decades, scientists assumed that the relatively small pelvic bones found in whales were simple remnants of their land-dwelling past, “useless vestiges” that served no real purpose, akin to the human appendix or tailbone.

A new study, co-authored by Erik Otárola-Castillo, a fellow in David Pilbeam’s paleoanthropology lab in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, suggests that the bones, in fact, have a very specific purpose — particularly when it comes to making baby whales and baby dolphins. The research is described in a recent...

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Birds everywhere

Birds everywhere

October 27, 2014

“I’m staggered by the diversity still,” said Maude Baldwin, looking into the display cases along the walls of the balcony in the Harvard Museum of Natural History’s Great Mammal Hall.

Inside are not mammals, but birds: some 750 specimens, cleaned and brightly lit, displayed in all their variety and splendor.

There are rails and wrens, hummingbirds and hawks, parrots and plovers, representatives of more than 180 families covering nearly all the world’s bird diversity. “Birds of the World,” a permanent exhibit, opened in September after months of design. It replaces...

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Harvard in Mexico City

Harvard in Mexico City

October 22, 2014

MEXICO CITY — In a building that originally housed a Jesuit college more than a century before the construction of Harvard’s Massachusetts Hall, alumni and friends of the University gathered yesterday in the heart of Mexico City for the latest event in the Your Harvard series. President Drew Faust, faculty members, and local alumni celebrated the many connections shared by Harvard and Mexico, some dating back more than a century.

Your Harvard is a global series of events organized by the Harvard Alumni...

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Harvard rolls out plan for the future

Harvard rolls out plan for the future

October 22, 2014

Businesses, government, and social-sector institutions — including higher education — must incorporate a deeper consideration of human well-being into the evolving approach to sustainable development at all levels, noted Harvard professors William Clark and Jack Spengler in the introduction to the Harvard Sustainability Plan.

The plan, released today, builds on this premise by setting a...

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Cooper Gallery makes an entrance

Cooper Gallery makes an entrance

October 21, 2014

Four years in the making, the Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art opens its doors this week.

Part of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, the gallery, which was designed by Harvard’s David Adjaye, the John C. Portman Design Critic in Architecture, repurposes a commercial space behind Peet’s Coffee, complete with a modern and eye-catching façade.

In a tour on Monday, Cooper Gallery Director Vera Grant expressed her enthusiasm for the gallery and its inaugural...

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Mixed results in report on concussions

Mixed results in report on concussions

October 21, 2014

While most colleges and universities in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) have created programs to help diagnose and treat concussions sustained by their athletes, many do not fully meet the NCAA’s standards, according to new work by Harvard researchers.

The report, the first-ever comprehensive examination of how colleges and universities have complied with the NCAA Concussion Policy and Legislation, is based on a survey sent to all 1,066 NCAA member institutions, 907...

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