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Department of Philosophy


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Courses




Courses

Course Listing & Room Locations

A list of introductory and 100-level courses for the 2014-2015 academic year is available here.

A listing of courses for academic year 2013-2014 is available here.

Please note that the second link will take you to the FAS Registrar's Office Website.


A list of current course room assignments for the Spring 2014 Term is available here.

Room assignments are subject to change, especially at the start of term, so please check back often once the listing is posted.

About the Department's Course Structure

In terms of course numbering, the Department's courses fall into three areas:
  • Introductory courses (3-99-level courses), generally for undergraduates
  • Mid-level courses (100-level courses), for graduates and undergraduates
  • Graduate seminars (200-level courses), for which enrollment is by permission of the instructor
The Department also offers courses in the General Education Curriculum and Core Curriculum, as well as Freshman Seminars.
When looking over our course offerings, potential applicants to our graduate program should note that 100-level courses are for both undergraduate and graduate students. Most of these courses are more advanced than non-introductory, but otherwise undergraduate, courses typically are. A student might find everyone from freshmen to second-year graduate students enrolled in one of these courses, with more advanced graduate students, and sometimes faculty, auditing.

Our course structure has two very positive effects on the character of Harvard's graduate program in philosophy.

For one thing, the course structure offers many more choices for graduate students than one might have expected.


Vistors to the Department might expect that graduate seminars are the only courses really intended for graduate students, because that is true at many departments. Since faculty typically teach, at most, one graduate seminar each year, the number of graduate-level courses in any given year tends to be bounded, at many departments, by the number of faculty.

At Harvard, since both graduate seminars and 100-level courses are intended for graduate students, a typical faculty member teaches two or even three courses each year for graduate students.

Furthermore, every 100-level lecture course has a graduate section attached to it, if there are graduate students enrolled in it. Led by the professor, this section meets weekly to discuss the material presented in lecture, or additional readings assigned only to graduate students. Since discussion is their whole purpose, the sections tend to be informal and very interactive. Moreover, these sections tend to be small, typically numbering four or five members, which may include auditors.

The result of this is that graduate students tend to see a lot of the faculty, from the very beginning of their time at Harvard through the end of their graduate study.

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