Courses, 2013 - 2014


Primarily for Undergraduates

*History of Science 91r. Supervised Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 1238
Anne Harrington and members of the Department
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Programs of directed reading and research to be conducted by a person approved by the Department.

*History of Science 97. Tutorial — Sophomore Year
Catalog Number: 5235
Anne Harrington
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Sophomore tutorial is a hands-on course that introduces students to some of the most exciting and productive questions in the history of science, technology and medicine, while developing critical reading, presentation and discussion skills. Small groups of students will tackle different aspects of a larger theme each week and share discoveries in sessions led by the faculty instructor. The course will be further enhanced by a series of supervised individual projects. During the 2014 spring term, the course instructor will be Megan Shields Formato.
Note: Required for undergraduate concentration in History and Science. Students must register for one plenary class session that meets on Mondays from 12:00-2:00 or 3:00-5:00, as well as a weekly section to be arranged.

*History of Science 98. Tutorial — Junior Year
Catalog Number: 1120
Aaron Pascal Mauck
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This one-semester junior tutorial is a research-oriented tutorial taken in small groups. Focuses on enhancing research and writing skills through the completion of a directed research paper on subject matter of the student’s interest. Must be taken during the fall semester (except for students not in residence).

*History of Science 99a. Tutorial — Senior Year
Catalog Number: 6619
Nadine Michele Weidman
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
Faculty-led seminar and intensive work with an individual advisor, directed towards production of the senior honors thesis.
Note: Students are expected to complete a thesis or submit a research paper or other approved project in order to receive course credit. This course must be taken Sat/Unsat.

*History of Science 99b. Tutorial — Senior Year - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 22497
Nadine Michele Weidman
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Faculty-led seminar and intensive work with an individual advisor, directed towards production of the senior honors thesis.
Note: Students are expected to complete a thesis or submit a research paper or other approved project in order to receive course credit. This course must be taken Sat/Unsat.

Cross-listed Courses

[Culture and Belief 11. Medicine and the Body in East Asia and in Europe]
[Culture and Belief 20. Reason and Faith in the West]
[Culture and Belief 34 (formerly Historical Study A-87). Madness and Medicine: Themes in the History of Psychiatry]
Culture and Belief 47 (formerly Historical Study B-45). The Darwinian Revolution
Culture and Belief 58. Case Studies in the Medical Humanities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Experience of Illness and Healing - (New Course)
[Environmental Science and Public Policy 78. Environmental Politics]
[Ethical Reasoning 33. Medical Ethics and History]
*Freshman Seminar 44t. The Atomic Bomb in History and Culture
*Freshman Seminar 44w. The Masquerade of Common Scents: An Exploration of Ephemeral Knowledge - (New Course)
*History 60c. The Nature of Modern China: Space, Science, and Environment - (New Course)
[Science of Living Systems 12. Understanding Darwinism]
[Science of the Physical Universe 17 (formerly Science A-41). The Einstein Revolution]
United States in the World 13 (formerly Historical Study A-34). Medicine and Society in America
United States in the World 30. Tangible Things: Harvard Collections in World History

For Undergraduates and Graduates


[History of Science 100. Knowing the World: An Introduction to the History of Science]
Catalog Number: 0905
Alex Csiszar
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
What are the origins of modern science and of the scientific method? Have the ways of knowing the world of different cultures and societies changed over time? How has scientific knowledge been related to other enterprises such as art, religion, literature, and commerce? We will ask these questions and more through a broad survey of many of the crucial moments in the development of science from the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century to the present day. Topics and figures will include Galileo, evolution, eugenics, the atomic bomb, and the human genome project.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Culture and Belief or the Core area requirement for Historical Study A. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

[History of Science 101. Knowledge on the Move: Cultures of Science in the Medieval World]
Catalog Number: 54617
Katharine Park and Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School)
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 5
Explores the development of scientific ideas and practices in the medieval Middle East and Western Europe, focusing on the circulation of texts, people, and objects. Special attention to religious, intellectual, social, and institutional contexts.
Note: Expected to be given in 2013–14. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3340.

[History of Science 106. History of Ancient Science]
Catalog Number: 3958
Mark Schiefsky
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
An examination of key aspects and issues in the development of ancient science, focusing on natural philosophy from the Presocratics to Aristotle as well as its relation to early Greek medicine and mathematics. Some consideration will also be given to the historiography of natural philosophy within this period.
Note: Expected to be given in 2013–14.

[History of Science 108. Bodies, Sexualities, and Medicine in the Medieval Middle East]
Catalog Number: 81052
Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School)
Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
This course will examine the ways in which medical, religious, cultural, and political discourses and practices interacted in the medieval and early modern Middle East to create and reflect multiple understandings of human bodies and sexualities. Special attention to debates on health, sexuality, and gender and racial identities.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3587. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study B.

[History of Science 111. Two Scientific Revolutions: From the Classical Age of Islamic Sciences to the Scientific World of Early Modern Europe]
Catalog Number: 96159
Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School)
Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Explores the emergence and consolidation in the Islamic Middle East of a new science and philosophy constructed in part out of Persian and Greek materials; the consolidation and development of this science in an Islamic context; and its connections with novel developments in sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century European science. Attention to cultural context, including imperial projects, societal transformation, and religious worldviews.
Note: Expected to be given in 2013–14. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study B.

History of Science 112. Magic, Medicine and Miracles: Health and Healing in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
Catalog Number: 8576
Katharine Park
Half course (spring term). Tu., Thu., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
An introduction to theories and practices of healing in the medical, religious, and magical realms. Topics include the construction of medical authority and expertise, potions and incantations, saints’ cults, the play of sex and gender among healers and patients, the multiple social and cultural roles played by early hospitals, and responses to "new" diseases such as syphilis and plague.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study B.

[History of Science 113. Crusades, Plagues and Hospitals: Medicine and Society in the Islamic Middle Ages]
Catalog Number: 59744
Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School)
Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Surveys the recasting of Islamic medical practices, traditions, and institutions in response to the many health challenges of the turbulent Middle Ages, from the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries, including wars, invasions, and epidemics.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study B.

*History of Science 118. Instruments and the Material Culture of Science in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800
Catalog Number: 79069 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jean-Francois Gauvin
Half course (fall term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
What is an instrument? Can there be more than one definition? What, if any, is the epistemological difference between Galileo’s telescope and rolling balls? Between Newton’s prisms, Hooke’s microscope, and Réaumur’s thermometer? This course looks at three centuries of science and particularly at its material culture. What makes an “instrument” a “scientific” instrument? Are all instruments “scientific”? How does an object become a scientific instrument? What are the relationships between theory and instruments? Readings and discussion, though at the core of the course, will be supplemented with visits in other Harvard museums and hands-on classes using the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

History of Science 121. The Einstein Revolution - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 54674 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Peter L. Galison
Half course (fall term). M., 1–3.
Albert Einstein has become the icon of modern science. Following his scientific, cultural, philosophical, and political trajectory, this course aims to track the changing role of physics in the 20th and 21st centuries. Addresses Einstein’s engagement with relativity, quantum mechanics, Nazism, nuclear weapons, philosophy, and technology, and raises basic questions about what it means to understand physics in its broader history. This is an exploratory version of a newly designed hybrid class, a combination of online background work and in-class discussion, demonstrations, film, performance and more.
Note: Students who have taken Science of the Physical Universe 17 may not take this course for credit. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of the Physical Universe or Culture and Belief, but not both. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

History of Science 122v. Science in the Cold War - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 80044
Melinda Baldwin
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 12
The Cold War was an era of unprecedented growth in the sciences -- and unprecedented political stakes for scientific research. This course will cover the history of the physical, biological, and human sciences during the Cold War. We will look at science on both sides of the Berlin Wall, paying particular attention to intersections between science, politics, and governments. Topics will include the Manhattan Project, the development of "big science," genetics and Lysenkoism, the nuclear arms race and the space race, scientific espionage, and communication between scientists in the West and in the Soviet world.

History of Science 124v. Radioactive Culture - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 53165
Melinda Baldwin
Half course (spring term). Th., 12–2.
Do your parents tell you stories about nuclear bomb drills in their elementary schools? Would you want to live in the same neighborhood as a nuclear power plant? Why did Stan Lee choose a radioactive spider to turn Peter Parker into Spider-Man? Our culture has strong ideas about radioactivity. How have those ideas changed over time? And how do they relate to the science of radioactivity? This seminar will explore the cultural history of radioactivity. Sample topics include newspaper coverage of nuclear science, ways people have prepared for possible nuclear catastrophes, and literature and films with nuclear themes.

[*History of Science 134. Nature on Display: Conference Course]
Catalog Number: 4987 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Janet Browne
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–4.
This conference course is run as an advanced seminar for undergraduates. We explore the way that living beings were collected, displayed, and discussed, from the 18th century to today. This means we look carefully at the different places in which natural history could be encountered in the past, such as museums, zoos, botanical gardens, marine stations, parks, and reserves, circuses and shows. It offers an opportunity to engage with some current issues in historical research, notably popular science and the material culture and ’spaces’ of science. The course hopes to enlarge your understanding of the complex relations between display, entertainment, and knowledge. A visit to the Museum of Comparative Zoology is an integral part of our studies.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[History of Science 135. From Darwin to Dolly: A History of the Modern Life Sciences]
Catalog Number: 58347
Sophia Roosth
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
This course surveys the history of modern biology, from the nineteenth century to now. Drawing on primary sources in biology, as well as readings from historians and anthropologists of science, students will be introduced to major themes and questions in the history of the modern life sciences. Topics include theories of natural selection, genetics, eugenics, genomics, ecology, molecular biology, artificial life, and biotechnology. Students will explore questions such as: what has “life” meant at different historical moments? What approaches have life scientists taken to investigating life — from cataloging to experimenting to making new living things? How have notions of “diversity” shaped biology, from Enlightenment taxonomies of nature to modern-day efforts at conserving biodiversity?

[History of Science 136. History of Biotechnology]
Catalog Number: 58601
Sophia Roosth
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
What becomes of life when researchers can materially manipulate and technically transform living things? This course historically investigates biotechnology in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, paying attention to how efforts to engineer life are grounded in social, cultural, and political contexts. Topics include reproductive technologies, genetic engineering and cloning, synthetic biology and bioinformatics, stem cells, intellectual property, and biosafety and biosecurity. Students will explore themes of ownership, personhood, biocitizenship, and biocapital by reading and discussing historical and anthropological accounts of biotechnology, as well as primary scientific publications, science fiction, and legal cases.

History of Science 138. Sex, Gender, and Evolution
Catalog Number: 30321
Sarah S. Richardson
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 12
Evolutionary theories of sex and gender and central controversies in human evolutionary biology from Darwin to the present. Topics include debates over the theory of sexual selection and the evolutionary basis of monogamy, sexual preference, physical attraction, rape, maternal instinct, and sex differences in cognition. Readings: primary texts and historical, philosophical, and feminist analyses.

[History of Science 139. The Postgenomic Moment]
Catalog Number: 81843
Sarah S. Richardson
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Joining "postgenomic" assessments of the genome projects, this seminar examines the history and contemporary practice of genomics from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include the role of technology, government funding, private industry, and race, gender, and nationality in the historical development of genomics, the ways in which genomic research challenges traditional conceptions of biology and science, and the implications of emerging trends such as direct-to-consumer genomics and whole-genome sequencing.
Note: Expected to be given in 2013–14.

History of Science 140v. The Historical and Cultural Lives of Drugs in the U.S. - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 79013
Nathan Greenslit
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 13
We will use readings in history, anthropology, and social theory to explore changing relationships between drugs and society in the 20th & 21st-century U.S. We will cover a broad range of topics, including the roles of race and gender; shifting philosophical, psychological and legal notions of the mind/body relationship, addiction and free will; roles of drugs in social movements and the ’politics of pleasure’; cross-cultural and transnational conflicts surrounding marijuana and cocaine; proliferation of psychiatric drugs; shifting attitudes towards tobacco and alcohol; the rise of the pharmaceutical industry and clinical trials; patient activism; U.S. drug enforcement laws and FDA legislation; strategic uses of neuroscience and epidemiology in social and political debates over drug regulation; and representations of drug-taking in popular culture.

History of Science 142. History and Politics of the American Obesity Epidemic
Catalog Number: 27547
Chin Jou
Half course (fall term). M., W., at 1, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 6
Obesity has become a leading public health concern in the industrialized West (and increasingly in other parts of the world). Rates of obesity in the United States have doubled in adults and tripled in children since 1980. How did this happen? And why is the obesity epidemic controversial? What does looking at the history and politics of the obesity epidemic reveal about broader issues of health and society throughout the twentieth-century United States? This course will illuminate these questions as we survey the trajectory of obesity from many dimensions since the beginning of the twentieth century.

History of Science 143v. Biomedicine and Health Policy in America - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 75269
Aaron Pascal Mauck
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4.
Health policies are often described as products of stakeholders, institutions, and political circumstances. Yet it is impossible to understand how health policies come about without taking into account biomedical research and practices. From the establishment of the NIH to the crafting of the Affordable Care Act, biomedicine has played a profound role in shaping the aim, scope, and structure of health policy- and vice-versa. This course explores this interrelationship from the late nineteenth century to the present, with the aim of better understanding the dynamic arrangement of science and politics that has shaped healthcare in America.

History of Science 145v. Advocacy, Activism, and Social Movements in Medicine - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 38834
Aaron Pascal Mauck
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4.
Modern medicine is often viewed as a system in which the few dominate the many in socially acceptable ways. By virtue of their expertise, doctors are given the right make life-changing decisions about people with relatively little say from those affected. Yet power relations between doctors and patients have historically been far more complicated, as non-experts have long strove to find a place in decision-making about medical research and treatment. With topics ranging from medical consumerism to targeted disease advocacy, this course examines the historical processes through which non-experts have sought to shape the course of medicine around their own beliefs, values, and goals.

[History of Science 146. Introduction to Women’s Bodies in Medicine ]
Catalog Number: 57761
Chin Jou
Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3
This course examines: 1) the evolution of medical and scientific discourse on women’s bodies, and the social and political developments that have informed those discussions; 2) the ways in which classifications and diagnoses of various pathologies have been gendered; and 3) the surveillance of women’s bodies via various screening measures. Specific course topics include: the history of hysteria, eating disorders, women’s representation in clinical trials, the HPV vaccine, contraception, and cosmetic surgery.

[History of Science 148. History of Global Health]
Catalog Number: 21054
Aaron Pascal Mauck
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 12
A survey course exploring the interrelated histories of public health, international health, and global health from the 19th to the 21st centuries, with attention to the relationship between Western and non-Western forms of scientific practice and health systems. This course will trace the role of health and medicine in mediating the relationships between metropolis and colony, state and citizen, North and South, public welfare and private interest, research practices and human subjects, the commodification of health and the body, and human rights discourse. The course will be divided chronologically into four parts, tracing imperial health formations in the long 19th century, the nascent internationalism of the interwar period, the construction of bureaucracies of development in the postwar and postcolonial era, and configurations of public- and private-sector actors in late 20th and early 21st century global health practices.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Historical Study A.

History of Science 149v. Explaining Epidemics - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 68182
Aaron Pascal Mauck
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11.
Outbreaks of epidemic disease have played a role in shaping human societies from the beginning of recorded history, transforming demographic patterns, social practices, and cultural expectations. Although they take fewer lives than the diseases we encounter every day, epidemics possess an extraordinary hold over our collective imagination. This course seeks to understand why. Through an analysis of outbreaks ranging from the Black Death to Avian Flu, we will explore the place of epidemic disease in human history, taking into account how those living in different times and places have responded when epidemics have appeared.

[History of Science 150. History of the Human Sciences]
Catalog Number: 0135
Rebecca M. Lemov
Half course (fall term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
Examination of the growth and development of social sciences such as sociology, anthropology, psychoanalysis, psychology, political science, and economics from the Enlightenment to the present. Innovators devised these fields to provide new, scientific ways to gain insight into age-old philosophical and religious questions, such as, What is the nature of the "self" or the "soul"? What binds human beings to one another? What is free will? What are the limits of social control, behavioral engineering, and the possible reach of techniques for adjustment and manipulation?

[*History of Science 152. Filming Science]
Catalog Number: 8254 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Peter L. Galison and Robb Moss
Half course (fall term). M., 1–3, W., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
Examination of the theory and practice of capturing scientific practice on film. Topics will include fictional, documentary, informational, and instructional films and raise problems emerging from film theory, visual anthropology and science studies. Each student will make and edit short film(s) about laboratory, field, or theoretical scientific work.

History of Science 153. History of Dietetics
Catalog Number: 1409 Enrollment: Limited to 35.
Steven Shapin
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
A survey of the relationships between medical expertise and human eating habits from Antiquity to the present, giving special attention to the links between practical and moral concerns and between expert and lay knowledge.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2014–15.

[History of Science 157. Sociology of Science]
Catalog Number: 2434
Steven Shapin
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
An introduction to a series of sociological topics concerning the scientific role, the scientific community, and scientific knowledge that are of special interest to historians. What are the social conditions for the institutionalization of science and for the support of the scientific role? What are the possibilities for a historical sociology of scientific knowledge? What social pressures have historically been exerted on our overall understanding of science and its relations with society?
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2014-15

[History of Science 164. Sense and Scientific Sensibility: Beyond Vision, From the Scientific Revolution to Now]
Catalog Number: 35633
Sophia Roosth
Half course (fall term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Scientific inquiry is often considered an endeavor pursued using one’s sense of vision: scientists peer into microscopes and telescopes, and stare at graphs, diagrams, and computer screens. But on what other senses do scientists rely? Do they also gather data using senses of hearing, smell, taste, and touch? How are the senses technologically mediated, and how do researchers evaluate sensory evidence? To address such questions, this course combines readings in the history and anthropology of science with classic primary sources.

[History of Science 165. The Scientific Revolution]
Catalog Number: 71921 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Alex Csiszar
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4.
When, where, and how did modern science come into being? Many historians and philosophers have looked to Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries to answer these questions. What it meant to learn about the natural world, even what nature was understood to be, underwent so many radical changes during this period that it became known as the Scientific Revolution. This seminar will examine the diverse meanings that have been given to this revolution. Topics will include the experimental method, the nature of belief, the role of communications media, instruments, gender, and natural history. There will be several opportunities for hands-on work with instruments, books, and prints housed in the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Houghton Library, and the Sackler Museum.

History of Science 166. "What is Enlightenment?": Science, Religion, and the Making of Modernity
Catalog Number: 83424
Soha Hassan Bayoumi
Half course (spring term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
From Immanuel Kant’s answer to this question in 1784 to Michel Foucault’s engagement with the same question and answer in 1984, two centuries had passed and a lot of water had flown under the bridge. From the inception of its ideals in the Anglo-Saxon world in the seventeenth century at the hands of Spinoza, John Locke and Isaac Newton, to its development in France in the eighteenth century by Voltaire, Montesquieu and Rousseau and culmination with the writings of Immanuel Kant, the Enlightenment developed into an important intellectual movement which helped shape modernity and its repercussions in the contemporary world. This course will trace the history of Enlightenment in primary sources, enriched by a collection of secondary readings, and will explore contemporary reflections on Enlightenment from various schools of thought ranging from Marxism to feminism and from postmodernism to conservatism. The course will address the themes of reason and rationality, science and knowledge, religion and religious institutions, tolerance and intolerance, ethics and morality.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3302.

*History of Science 171. Narrative and Neurology
Catalog Number: 3222
Nathan Greenslit
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
An exploration of the complex relationship between the making of brain science and the human stories/experiences of brain damaged people. We will look at iconic cases of brain damage including Phineas Gage and H.M. (and who speaks for them), the emergence and historical function of neurological case histories, the study of brain-damaged soldiers in WWI, the "neurological novels" of Alexander Luria, the popularization of neuroscience via authors like Oliver Sacks and V.S. Ramachandran, the brain-injured patient as author, including how nowadays patients may use social media to narrate their own experiences with neurological impairment, and the notion of "neurodiversity."

History of Science 172v. Self and Society: A Cultural History of Psychology - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 20343
Susan Marie Lanzoni
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
How has the study of psychology shaped our conception of ourselves over the past 200 years? This course examines the various "selves" of scientific psychology and their refractions in popular, literary, and visual culture in the modern period. Topics include: reflective methods in early modern psychologies, the mind’s "faculties" and phrenology in nineteenth century popular science; the rise of experimental psychology and the fascination with psychical research; photography and the study of emotion in evolutionary psychology; intelligence testing, race and eugenics, psychology in the clinic, personality testing, the psychology of art; behaviorism; social psychology and studies of prejudice, cognitive and computational models of mind, and recent work in positive psychology.

History of Science 173v. Emotions: Science and History - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 91017
Susan Marie Lanzoni
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
Fear, anger, love, empathy - are these emotions of the body or of the mind? Physiological or cognitive? Culturally determined or universal? An evolutionary inheritance or uniquely human? This course explores the answers to these questions given by psychologists, physiologists, social scientists, and neuroscientists of the modern period, in concert with changing technologies for documenting and recording emotion, including etchings, photographs, graphic traces, questionnaires, film and neuroimaging. We examine Lavatar’s physiognomy, Duchenne’s electrophysiology, Darwin’s and William James’ theories of emotion, twentieth century experiments on empathy and fear in psychology and neuroscience, and also give attention to current debates on the study of affect in history, and the historiography of emotion in the history of science.

[History of Science 174
Catalog Number: 1750
Rebecca M. Lemov
Half course (spring term). M., W., (F.), at 11. EXAM GROUP: 4
This course focuses on high-impact experiments - among them, the Milgram "Obedience" experiments and the Stanford Prison Experiment - carried out in the twentieth-century human sciences by anthropologists, sociologists, social psychologists, and/or experimental psychologists. Many dreamed of a "technology of human behavior" and conducted experiments toward this end. What were the results, and how do they continue to affect our thinking and daily lives today?

[History of Science 176. Brainwashing and Modern Techniques of Mind Control]
Catalog Number: 76277
Rebecca M. Lemov
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 3
This course examines the phenomenon of "brainwashing" as a modern set of techniques that can apparently force a subject radically to alter her beliefs against her will. The Cold War roots of ’brainwashing’ - both the myth and the reality -- lie in the politics of twentieth-century anti-Communism and the deeper fear that people’s most strongly held thoughts, ideas, and ideological commitments could be vulnerable to powerful infiltration. In order to understand the dynamics of this process we will examine case studies beginning with the Korean War-era emergence of the term ’brainwashing’, the American interdisciplinary science of "coercive persuasion" that arose in response, and successive waves of technological, political, and sociocultural developments. We will also look at how brainwashing and analogous persuasive techniques may operate among larger groups, crowds, organizations, and mass societies.

*History of Science 179v. The Freudian Century - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 84218
Elizabeth Lunbeck
Half course (spring term). W., 4–6. Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Explores the consolidation and rise to prominence of a distinctively modern psychological perspective on human nature, motivation, and desire from 1900 to the present. Opens with the debut of therapeutic culture and the Freudian recasting of the self, with attention to dreams, sexuality, interiority, gender, and cultures of trauma. Moves to the mid-century period and beyond, the heyday of the psychological perspective in the United States, looking at the psychology of affluence, the invention of "identity," the new narcissism, and personalities and power in the workplace. Ends with an assessment of the virtues and liabilities of the 21st century expressive self.

History of Science 180. Science, Technology, and Society in Modern East Asia
Catalog Number: 5317
Dong-Won Kim
Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course aims to survey the history of science and technology in East Asian countries—China, Japan and Korea—since the late 19th century. It will emphasize the mutual influence between science & technology and society to answer how they become major industrial powers in the 21st century.

[History of Science 185 (formerly History of Science 282). Communicating Science: From Print Culture to Cybersocieties]
Catalog Number: 20399 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Alex Csiszar
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Science doesn’t just happen in the lab. Scientific results have to be communicated among scientists, and to the public. This course investigates the ways in which scientific knowledge circulates, and pays special attention to how new communications media have shaped knowledge-in-the-making. Topics will include the history of scientific genres (letters, encyclopedias, periodicals), popular science, peer review, intellectual property, and new information technologies. Selected classes will take place in Houghton Library.

[History of Science 190. Science Facts and Science Fictions]
Catalog Number: 28387
Hannah Roosth
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 11.
This course uses science fiction as a lens through which to view the history of science and technology. By reading sci-fi literature (including novels and short stories by Shelley, Wells, Verne, and Butler, as well as more recent works by Heinlein, Asimov, Le Guin, Gibson, and Atwood) and viewing sci-fi films, this course asks how science is fictionalized, and what such representations tell us about science as an enterprise that melds present contexts with futurism and fantasy. Topics include: time travel, utopias and dystopias, other worlds, artificial intelligence, robotics, alien life.

[*History of Science 193. History and Technology of Food Production in Modern America]
Catalog Number: 42654 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Chin Jou
Half course (fall term). Th., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 18
For much of the twentieth century, America has enjoyed a secure, reliable food supply. To be sure, Americans’ access to food and the quality of the food they consume vary widely. But food is generally available. Whether found in supermarkets, farmer’s markets, convenience stores, or restaurants of every variety, there is an abundance of food and a surfeit of choices. How did this come to be? How did high-yield agriculture develop? How did processed foods find their way to store shelves? To illuminate these questions and more, we will examine the history, technology, and politics of agricultural production throughout the twentieth century. We will also consider contemporary food production practices and ethical dilemmas about how food is produced. Course readings will cover how food has been cultivated, manufactured, and distributed, as well as the human labor behind some of these production stages.

History of Science 196. Justice in Health: Ethics of Public Health in the Contemporary World
Catalog Number: 92662
Soha Hassan Bayoumi
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2-4.
Public health is distinctly political. It is a field where moral and political philosophy play a significant role. Contemporary political debates on justice have very often brought up questions of public health and what justice in health means. This course addresses central issues in the philosophy of health and health care, investigating how some fundamental questions in this field have been answered and exploring possible alternatives to those answers. Questions we consider include: What is health? What is health care? Does health enjoy a special moral significance? What is it? Is health/health care a fundamental human right? Why do persons and communities differ in their health outcomes and when are these differences considered unjust? What are the limits of personal and social responsibility for health? How can we meet health needs fairly? The course also probes questions of class, race, gender and age in its discussion of justice in health and examines ethical questions in global health.

History of Science 197. Nature, Environment, and the Understanding of Space
Catalog Number: 69934
Jeanne Marie Haffner
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Investigations of the natural world have focused on different concepts at different historical moments. In America, for instance, the notion of "wilderness" was most prevalent in the late-nineteenth century; that of "environment" became central in the twentieth; and, from the postwar era to the present, analyses of the inextricability of spatial form and social organization have dominated scholarship and social activism alike. The aim of this seminar is to examine these shifts, exploring how they were employed within particular historical contexts, and to assess their implications for the past, present, and future of environmental movements in Europe and America.

History of Science 198. Controversy: Explorations at the Intersection of Science, Policy, and Politics - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 62073
Naomi Oreskes
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Science is supposed to give us factual knowledge, yet scientific results often become mired in political controversy. This course examines the sources of controversy around scientific matters that bear on political questions. Topics include the role of experts in a democratic society, the role of values in scientific research and reasoning, the demarcation between controversy in science v. controversy about science, and the matter of whether any question can ever be deemed to be “purely” scientific.

Cross-listed Courses

Classical Studies 165. Medicine in the Greco-Roman World
*History 1915 (formerly History 1415). The Nine Lives of Benjamin Franklin: Conference Course
[*MCB 142. Major Advances in Classical and Molecular Genetics]
[Sociology 160. Medicine, Health Policy and Bioethics in Comparative and Global Perspective: Conference Course]
Sociology 180. Law, Science, and Society in America
*Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality 1421. Medical Management of the Female Body

 

Primarily for Graduates

[*History of Science 200. Knowing the World: Studying the History of Science]
Catalog Number: 11825
Alex Csiszar
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
This is the graduate section to History of Science 100, Knowing the World: An Introduction to the History of Science.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[*History of Science 206r. Physical Atomism in Antiquity: Epicurus and Lucretius: Seminar ]
Catalog Number: 2410
Mark Schiefsky
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Reading of Epicurus’ Letter to Herodotus in Book X of Diogemes Laertius, together with Epicurean atomism in Lucretius’ De rerum natura and its criticism in other ancient sources. All readings in translation.

[History of Science 209. Science, Religion and Culture: Debates, Methods and Controversies]
Catalog Number: 74851
Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School)
Half course (fall term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
Critical examination of different methods and theories in history and philosophy of science and STS (Science, Technology and Society studies) along with discussions of a number of tools in the study and history of culture and religion and how they can be utilized in the study of science and religion; away from the conflict/reconciliation paradigms and towards examining the perceived relations and exchanges of science and religion through analyzing paradigms, discourses, traditions and authorities. The course can serve as a methodological introduction to history and philosophy of science and STS. The course is a research workshop with a focus on training and professionalization and an emphasis on methods tools in academic writing and research. Students work on specific projects throughout the semester from topic selection, question formation, to research and writing to produce a piece of academic writing such as research papers, conference papers, articles, book reviews, prospectus, syllabi, etc.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3341.

[History of Science 212. The Sciences of Life, Medicine and the Body in Medieval and Renaissance Europe]
Catalog Number: 0500
Katharine Park
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Graduate colloquium for students preparing for general examinations in the fields covered by the course, as well as other students wishing to develop a comprehensive picture of the subject through extensive reading of secondary sources.

[History of Science 215r. Science and Culture in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Seminar]
Catalog Number: 4568
Katharine Park
Half course (fall term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Explores the relations between new forms of scientific knowledge and the new literary genre of the utopian fiction in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe, including works by More, Palissy, Brahe, Campanella, Bacon, Cavendish, and Fontenelle.
Prerequisite: Some familiarity with the history of early modern European art or science and reading knowledge of at least one European language in addition to English.

History of Science 231. Transforming Technologies: Science, Technology, and Social Change - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 64715
Naomi Oreskes
Half course (spring term). W., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 3, 4
Climate change threatens severe dislocation of our environment, culture and infrastructure, as well as substantial losses to biodiversity and natural beauty. Virtually all experts agree that to avoid extensive disruptive climate change, we must transform our energy system from one based on burning carbon-based fuels to renewables or other energy sources that are net carbon-neutral. This will require a technological transformation. This course examines that challenge in light of past and present transforming technologies. In the first part of the class, we examine past examples of technological transformation, and consider what we might learn from them. In particular, we consider the questions: where do new technologies come from? What has been the role of the free market v. the role of conscious planning? Does technology drive social change or does social change drive technological innovation? Above all, how do we get the technologies we need? Do we get the technologies we need? In the second part we examine the required energy transition to prevent anthropogenic climate change, and the obstacles to it.

History of Science 237. Postgenomics - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 20249
Sarah S. Richardson
Half course (fall term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
Joining "postgenomic" assessments of the genome projects, this seminar examines the history and contemporary practice of genomics from a multidisciplinary perspective. Topics include the role of technology, government funding, private industry, and race, gender, and nationality in the historical development of genomics, the ways in which genomic research challenges traditional conceptions of biology and science, and the implications of emerging trends such as direct-to-consumer genomics and whole-genome sequencing.

History of Science 238. Rethinking the Darwinian Revolution: Seminar
Catalog Number: 9533
Janet Browne
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4.
Taking Charles Darwin as a well-documented case study, we will explore the historiography of evolutionary ideas from 1900 onwards, covering the political , social, and scientific commitments involved in the concept of a "Darwinian Revolution." We take a special interest in tracking evolutionary ideas in Victorian literature. There will be an opportunity for graduate students to read key Darwin texts and put together their own syllabus on the history of Darwinism.

[History of Science 245. The Changing Concept of Race in Science and Medicine in the United States: From Jefferson to Genomics]
Catalog Number: 57429
Evelynn M. Hammonds
Half course (fall term). Th., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 18
This course explores the history of the concept of "race" as used by biologists, anthropologists, and physicians from the 17th century to the present and social and political responses to the concept of race in these fields.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates.

[*History of Science 246. History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology]
Catalog Number: 19559
David Shumway Jones
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of life in both medicine and biology. Topics include: natural history and medicine before the emergence of biology; the history of heredity and molecular biology; race and medicine in the colonies and the metropole; bioeconomic exchange; old and new forms of biopower at molecular, organismic, and global scales. The seminar trains students to engage in scholarly debates in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences about the nature of life, the body, and biomedicine. Co-taught with Professor Stefan Helmreich (MIT Anthropology); the class will meet at Harvard.

History of Science 247. Current Issues in the History of Medicine: Seminar
Catalog Number: 28251
Allan M. Brandt
Half course (fall term). M., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
Explores new methods for understanding disease, medicine, and society, ranging from historical demography to cultural studies. Topics include patterns of health and disease, changes in medical science and clinical practice, the doctor-patient relationship, health care systems, alternative healing, and representations of the human body. The course will focus on historical problem-framing, research strategies, and writing.

History of Science 248. Ethics and Judgment in the History of Science and Medicine
Catalog Number: 61433
David Shumway Jones
Half course (spring term). W., 2-4.
Examines the tensions felt by historians and physicians between historicizing past ethical behaviors and norms and wanting to pass judgment on past actors and actions. Topics include contested diseases and accusations of unethical research; the focus in Spring 2014 will be on controversial therapeutics.

*History of Science 250. Readings in Women’s Bodies in Medicine
Catalog Number: 72868
Chin Jou
Half course (spring term). Th., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 18
For graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Topics will be similar to those covered in History of Science 146, "Introduction to Women’s Bodies in Medicine," but with additional readings and a focus on historiography. Students will complete a 20-25 page paper based on original research.

[*History of Science 253. Bioethics, Law, and the Life Sciences ]
Catalog Number: 4500
Sheila Jasanoff (Kennedy School)
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30.
Seeks to identify and explore salient ethical, legal, and policy issues – and possible solutions – associated with developments in biotechnology and the life sciences.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15. Offered jointly with the Kennedy School as IGA-515. May not be taken for credit by students who have already taken IGA-515 (KSG).

*History of Science 259. The History of the History of Science
Catalog Number: 68494
Steven Shapin
Half course (spring term). Tu., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 16, 17
A critical survey of conceptions of the history of science over the past hundred years or so and an interpretative engagement with why what’s been said about science and its history has mattered so much.
Note: Expected to be omitted in 2014–15.

[*History of Science 261. Ethnography of Science and Technology]
Catalog Number: 21346
Sophia Roosth
Half course (fall term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
This course surveys monographs in the ethnography of science, both canonical and current. How have the methods and tools of the interpretive social sciences been applied to cultures of science and technology? What is the relation of description to analysis in ethnographies of science? How do such ethnographies approach theory-building and interpretation? Beginning with early work in the sociology of scientific knowledge and laboratory studies, students will read work in feminist science studies, field and environmental studies, multi-sited ethnography, sensory ethnography, and ethnographic accounts of digital worlds. Throughout, pressure will be placed on issues of method, style, and representation.

[History of Science 265. Science in/as/of Culture]
Catalog Number: 43494
Sophia Roosth
Half course (spring term). M., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
This seminar introduces students to Science and Technology Studies (STS), an interdisciplinary field seeking to understand the natural sciences as cultural and social practices. STS increasingly draws upon a diverse methodological and analytic toolkit: not only sociology, anthropology, and philosophy, but cultural studies, critical theory, gender, race, and postcolonial studies, and laboratory studies. Each unit in this course combines theories and methods in the social study of science with a series of cross-cutting themes including: proof, controversy, practice, actants and agency, post-humanism. Students will investigate the relation of STS to the History of Science and explore recent trends and theories in STS.

[*History of Science 267. Science and Social Thought]
Catalog Number: 10653
Alex Csiszar and Sophia Roosth
Half course (fall term). Hours to be arranged.
How does social theory serve as a toolkit for historians and anthropologists of science? How can we appropriate, reinterpret, extend, or query theory in order to ground and drive our own analyses of scientific practice and culture? This course examines critical history and social theory and its impact on recent studies of science, technology, and medicine. Each unit pairs theoretical and methodological texts with empirical studies in history and ethnography of science that apply those theories. Students will be introduced to classic texts in social and critical theory, including Marx, Weber, Geertz, Foucault, Derrida, and White. Weekly discussion focuses on the relation of empiricism to theory, encouraging students to read theory as a means of generating their own understandings of science and technology.
Note: Expected to be given in 2014–15.

[History of Science 270. Sciences of the Self]
Catalog Number: 58523
Rebecca M. Lemov
Half course (spring term). Th., 12–2. EXAM GROUP: 14, 15
How social, human and behavioral scientists pursued a science of the self from French-revolution-era theories of the "bourgeois self" to Freud’s insights about hysterics to mid-twentieth-century American theories of "personality" to biological and computational models of the late-twentieth century (e.g., the "quantified self" movement). What is the relationship of self to soul and self to society? Some attention to the historiography of the psychological and social sciences will also be given.

[History of Science 271. Self as Data]
Catalog Number: 72536
Rebecca M. Lemov
Half course (fall term). Th., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
Many scholars have considered how the modern self became an object of expert knowledge, scientific experimentation, and institutional discipline. This seminar focuses on cases, past and present, in which individuals treat their own habits, bodies, moods, and thoughts as objects of scrutiny, analysis, and intervention. Ranging from 19th century diary writing and the Buckminster Fuller Chronofiles to contemporary diet techniques, Benjamin Franklin’s self-monitoring practices to the Quantified Self movement’s digital data collection apps, the seminar explores what shifting modes of self-tracking, self-care, and self-governance reveal about changing understandings of the self, and how they remake subjectivity.
Note: This course will be co-taught with Prof. Natasha Schull (MIT Program in Science, Technology, and Society).

[*History of Science 274v. Topics in the History of Psychoanalysis]
Catalog Number: 87975
Elizabeth Lunbeck
Half course (spring term). Th., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 12, 13
An introduction to issues and concepts in psychoanalysis, considered clinically in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts. Major texts, figures, and controversies from Freud to the present. The course will focus on conceptualizations of theory creation and change, and on research and writing strategies.
Note: Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

History of Science 279v. Freud and His Legacies: Readings in the History of Psychoanalysis - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 66452
Elizabeth Lunbeck
Half course (fall term). W., 4–6.
Selected topics in psychoanalysis from Freud to the present, with attention to conceptualizing and writing the discipline’s history. Among topics to be covered are the conditions of theory change, historicizing the analytic self, and assembling the analytic archive; locating major figures and national schools (Klein, Lacan, Kohut; Britain, France, Argentina); case studies in thinking with psychoanalysis-understandings of people and possessions, conflict and aggression, warfare and welfare; and pathologies of everyday life, from the abused wife to the corporate titan. Throughout, the seminar will focus more generally on writing intellectual and disciplinary histories. Note: Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

*History of Science 285. Science, Power and Politics
Catalog Number: 5124
Sheila Jasanoff (Kennedy School)
Half course (fall term). W., 2:10–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
This seminar introduces students to the major contributions of the field of science and technology studies (STS) to the understanding of politics and policymaking in democratic societies.
Note: Offered jointly with the Kennedy School as IGA-513.

History of Science 289. Entangled Objects: Or the Stuff of Science, Culture, and Society
Catalog Number: 84196 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Jean-Francois Gauvin
Half course (spring term). W., 4–6. EXAM GROUP: 9
This course focuses on things: from the Indian sari to the iPod. Its aim is to look at objects from a variety of angles (science, anthropology, art, cultural studies) and to investigate what makes them such powerful anchors--actors--of our daily lives. The readings and discussions will provide a strong theoretical background to the final assignment: designing and mounting a temporary exhibit.

[*History of Science 296. The Digital Self]
Catalog Number: 74548 Enrollment: Limited to 25.
Peter L. Galison and Martha L. Minow (Law School)
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 7, 8
Social theory, philosophical texts, and historical works help situate understandings of the human "self"; how do these and other materials shed light on conceptions and experiences of the "self" enacted in new digital technologies including the internet, surveillance, multi-person virtual games, and virtual realities? With attention to the implications of these new experiences for freedom of expression, theft and other crimes, democratic participation, and consumption, the course will include materials from law, history of science, and political and social theory.

[*History of Science 297. Digital Power, Digital Interpretation, Digital Making]
Catalog Number: 67917
Peter L. Galison, Martha L. Minow (Law School), Jeffrey Schnapp, and Jonathan L. Zittrain
Half course (fall term). M., 1:10–3:10. EXAM GROUP: 6, 7, 8
Harvard is beginning a new initiative to explore the intersection of digital power, digital making and digital interpretation. This is a working seminar designed to explore these questions through a cluster of projects designed to cross theorizing with making. For example: What is the health of the internet and how could we construct ways to measure it? What might the next generation of digital humanities look like as it explores the crossover between digital and physical objects? How can digital filmmaking connect with new forms of interactive design and exhibition?
Note: Interested students must complete an application form, which can be found on the course website.

Cross-listed Courses

[East Asian Film and Media Studies 200 (formerly East Asian Studies 200). The Uses and Meaning of the New Arts of Presentation]
History 2462. Readings in the U.S. in the 20th Century: Proseminar
Japanese History 260r. Topics in Japanese Cultural History
Mathematics 265x. Reasoning via Models - (New Course)
[*Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality 2010. Science, Nature, and Gender (Graduate Seminar in General Education)]

Graduate Courses of Reading and Research

*History of Science 300. Direction of Doctoral Dissertations
Catalog Number: 3388
Allan M. Brandt 3031, Janet Browne 5511, Alex Csiszar 2475 (on leave 2013-14), Peter L. Galison 3239 (on leave 2013-14), Jean-Francois Gauvin 3205, Evelynn M. Hammonds 4545 (on leave 2013-14), Anne Harrington 1895 (on leave 2013-14), Sheila Jasanoff (Kennedy School) 2248, David Shumway Jones 3111, Shigehisa Kuriyama 5269, Rebecca M. Lemov 5570 (on leave 2013-14), Naomi Oreskes 3983, Katharine Park 2974, Scott Harris Podolsky (Medical School) 6984, Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School) 6263, Sarah S. Richardson 6730, Sophia Roosth 2722 (on leave 2013-14), Mark Schiefsky 2354, and Steven Shapin 3984
Note: Under special circumstances arrangements may be made for other instruction in guidance for doctoral dissertations.

*History of Science 301. Reading and Research
Catalog Number: 5641
Allan M. Brandt 3031, Janet Browne 5511, Alex Csiszar 2475 (on leave 2013-14), Peter L. Galison 3239 (on leave 2013-14), Jean-Francois Gauvin 3205, Evelynn M. Hammonds 4545 (on leave 2013-14), Anne Harrington 1895 (on leave 2013-14), Sheila Jasanoff (Kennedy School) 2248, David Shumway Jones 3111, Shigehisa Kuriyama 5269, Rebecca M. Lemov 5570 (on leave 2013-14), Everett I. Mendelsohn 2700, Naomi Oreskes 3983, Katharine Park 2974, Scott Harris Podolsky (Medical School) 6984, Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School) 6263, Sarah S. Richardson 6730, Sophia Roosth 2722 (on leave 2013-14), Mark Schiefsky 2354, and Steven Shapin 3984
Individual work in preparation for the General Examination for the PhD degree.

*History of Science 302. Guided Research
Catalog Number: 5282
Allan M. Brandt 3031, Janet Browne 5511, Alex Csiszar 2475 (on leave 2013-14), Peter L. Galison 3239 (on leave 2013-14), Jean-Francois Gauvin 3205, Evelynn M. Hammonds 4545 (on leave 2013-14), Anne Harrington 1895 (on leave 2013-14), Sheila Jasanoff (Kennedy School) 2248, David Shumway Jones 3111, Shigehisa Kuriyama 5269, Rebecca M. Lemov 5570 (on leave 2013-14), Everett I. Mendelsohn 2700, Robb Moss 1392, Naomi Oreskes 3983, Katharine Park 2974, Scott Harris Podolsky (Medical School) 6984, Ahmed Ragab (Divinity School) 6263, Sarah S. Richardson 6730, Sophia Roosth 2722 (on leave 2013-14), Mark Schiefsky 2354, and Steven Shapin 3984
Through regular meetings with faculty advisor, each student will focus on research and writing with the purpose of developing a publishable research paper.

*History of Science 310hf. History of Science Salon
Catalog Number: 1047
Naomi Oreskes
Half course (throughout the year). Hours to be arranged.
What is history of science about as a discipline and profession? This half-course meets throughout the academic year to introduce first-year graduate students to the range of debates, questions, and research practices currently shaping the field.
Note: The course is required for first year students in the PhD program and students in the AM program in the History of Science.

 

 

 

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