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Below are resources recommended by the staff. As per the course's syllabus, brownie points (and possibly brownies) will be awarded to students who keep the staff apprised by email of the latest developments in the realms of XML, Java, Java Servlet, and JSP.
APIs

Java 2 Platform Standard Edition 5.0: API Specification. "This document is the API specification for the Java 2 Platform Standard Edition 5.0."

Java API for XML Processing (JAXP) Specification 1.3. "JAXP is the standard API for XML processing in the Java Platform."

Java Servlet 2.5. "Java Servlet technology provides Web developers with a simple, consistent mechanism for extending the functionality of a Web server and for accessing existing business systems. A servlet can almost be thought of as an applet that runs on the server side -- without a face. Java servlets have made many Web applications possible."

Xalan-J 2. "Xalan-Java implements the W3C Recommendation 16 November 1999 XSL Transformations (XSLT) Version 1.0."

Xerces-J 2. "Xerces2 is the next generation of high performance, fully compliant XML parsers in the Apache Xerces family." It supports several feature flags.
CSS

Cascading Style Sheets, level 1. W3C Recommendation, 17 December 1996; revised 11 January 1999.

Cascading Style Sheets, level 2. W3C Recommendation, 12 May 1998.

W3Schools's CSS Tutorial. "Save a lot of work with CSS! In our CSS tutorial you will learn how to use CSS to control the style and layout of multiple Web pages all at once."
DOM

Document Object Model (DOM) Level 3 Core Specification 1.0. W3C Recommendation, 7 April 2004.

Understanding DOM. "Even before there was XML, there was the Document Object Model, or DOM. It allows a developer to refer to, retrieve, and change items within an XML structure, and is essential to working with XML. In this tutorial, you will learn about the structure of a DOM document. You will also learn how to use Java technology to create a Document from an XML file, make changes to it, and retrieve the output."

W3Schools's XML DOM Tutorial. "In our XML DOM tutorial you will learn what DOM is. The XML DOM is a programming interface for XML documents. It defines the way an XML document can be accessed and manipulated."
DTD

W3Schools's DTD Tutorial. "In our DTD tutorial you will learn what DTD is. You will know how to use a DTD to define the legal elements of an XML document."

XML Files's DTD Tutorial. "Copyright 1999-2003 Jupitermedia Corporation All Rights Reserved."

Zvon's DTD Tutorial. "In this tutorial basic DTD features are demonstrated on many examples."
HTTP

RFC 2109: HTTP State Management Mechanism. "This document specifies a way to create a stateful session with HTTP requests and responses. It describes two new headers, Cookie and Set-Cookie, which carry state information between participating origin servers and user agents. The method described here differs from Netscape's Cookie proposal, but it can interoperate with HTTP/1.0 user agents that use Netscape's method."

RFC 2616: Hypertext Transfer Protocol -- HTTP/1.1. "The Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is an application-level protocol for distributed, collaborative, hypermedia information systems. It is a generic, stateless, protocol which can be used for many tasks beyond its use for hypertext, such as name servers and distributed object management systems, through extension of its request methods, error codes and headers. A feature of HTTP is the typing and negotiation of data representation, allowing systems to be built independently of the data being transferred."
Java

Java Tutorial, The. "A practical guide for programmers with hundreds of complete, working examples and dozens of 'trails'--groups of lessons on a particular subject."
Javadoc

Javadoc Tool Home Page. "Javadoc is the tool from Sun Microsystems for generating API documentation in HTML format from doc comments in source code."
JavaServer Pages (JSP) and Java Servlet

Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages. "The second edition of Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages is now available for free access in PDF."

JavaServer Pages: Implementations and Specifications. "JSP technology is an extension of the servlet technology created to support authoring of HTML and XML pages. It makes it easier to combine fixed or static template data with dynamic content."

Java Servlet Technology: Implementations and Specifications. "Java Servlet technology provides Web developers with a simple, consistent mechanism for extending the functionality of a Web server and for accessing existing business systems. A servlet can almost be thought of as an applet that runs on the server side -- without a face. Java servlets have made many Web applications possible."
JAXP

Evolution of JAXP, The. "So what exactly is JAXP?"

Fast and Easy XML Processing. "This article explains some of the new concepts and important features introduced in JAXP 1.3."

What's new in JAXP 1.3? Part 1. "An overview of the technology, and a look at parsing API changes and a new validation API."

What's new in JAXP 1.3? Part 2. "XPath capabilities, utilities that support namespaces, and other enhancements."
JSTL

Introduction to JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL). "Beginning JSTL Tutorial."

JSTL Documentation. "The JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library (JSTL) encapsulates, as simple tags, core functionality common to many JSP applications. For example, instead of suggesting that you iterate over lists using a scriptlet or different iteration tags from numerous vendors, JSTL defines a standard tag that works the same everywhere. This standardization lets you learn a single tag and use it on multiple JSP containers. Also, when tags are standard, containers can recognize them and optimize their implementations."

Practical JSTL, Part 1. "If you have heard about the JSP Standard Tag Library (JSTL) but aren't quite sure of how to make the best use of it, this first of two excerpts from the JSTL: Practical Guide for JSP Programmers provides an introduction to the technology."

The JSTL Expression Language. "Examine the JSTL expression language in detail, starting with expressions and identifiers, and ending with sections on using the expression language for custom action attributes and common mistakes that developers make when using the expression language."
Namespaces in XML

Namespaces in XML 1.1 (Second Edition). W3C Recommendation, 16 August 2006. "XML namespaces provide a simple method for qualifying element and attribute names used in Extensible Markup Language documents by associating them with namespaces identified by IRI references."

Zvon's Namespace Tutorial. "This material has been developed for Zvon, where you can find other not only XML related materials (both basic and advanced tutorials and references about XSLT, XML, DTD, Mozilla, CSS, schemas, regular expressions, ...)"
SAX

SAX. "This is the official website for SAX."

SAX2 Standard Feature Flags. "One of the essential characteristics of SAX2 is that it added feature flags which can be used to examine and perhaps modify parser modes, in particular modes such as validation. Since features are identified by (absolute) URIs, anyone can define such features. Currently defined standard feature URIs have the prefix http://xml.org/sax/features/ before an identifier such as validation."

Understanding SAX. "This tutorial examines the use of the Simple API for XML version 2.0.x, or SAX 2.0.x. It is aimed at developers who have an understanding of XML and wish to learn this lightweight, event-based API for working with XML data. It assumes that you are familiar with concepts such as well-formedness and the tag-like nature of an XML document. In this tutorial, you will learn how to use SAX to retreive, manipulate, and output XML data."
SFTP

How to SFTP Files to nice.fas.harvard.edu from Mac OS. "This document explains how to install and use MacSFTP, freeware for Mac OS; itís installed on most Macs around campus and can also be installed on yours."

How to SFTP Files to nice.fas.harvard.edu from Windows. "This document explains how to install and use SecureFX, commercial software for Windows for which Harvard has a site license; it's installed on most PCs around campus and can also be installed on yours."
SOAP

SOAP Version 1.2 Part 0: Primer. W3C Candidate Recommendation, 19 December 2002. "SOAP Version 1.2 Part 0: Primer is a non-normative document intended to provide an easily understandable tutorial on the features of the SOAP Version 1.2 specifications. In particular, it describes the features through various usage scenarios, and is intended to complement the normative text contained in Part 1 and Part 2 of the SOAP 1.2 specifications."

SOAP Version 1.2 Part 1: Messaging Framework. W3C Candidate Recommendation, 19 December 2002. "SOAP Version 1.2 is a lightweight protocol intended for exchanging structured information in a decentralized, distributed environment. "Part 1: Messaging Framework" defines, using XML technologies, an extensible messaging framework containing a message construct that can be exchanged over a variety of underlying protocols."

SOAP Version 1.2 Part 2: Adjuncts. W3C Candidate Recommendation, 19 December 2002. "SOAP Version 1.2 is a lightweight protocol intended for exchanging structured information in a decentralized, distributed environment. SOAP Version 1.2 Part 2: Adjuncts defines a set of adjuncts that may be used with SOAP Version 1.2 Part1: Messaging Framework. This specification depends on SOAP Version 1.2 Part 1: Messaging Framework."

W3Schools's SOAP Tutorial. "SOAP is a simple XML based protocol to let applications exchange information over HTTP. In our SOAP tutorial, you will learn what SOAP is, and how it uses XML to exchange information between applications."
SSH

How to SSH to nice.fas.harvard.edu from Mac OS. "This document explains how to use Terminal, software for Mac OS that comes with Mac OS itself; it should thus be installed on all Macs around campus as well as on yours."

How to SSH to nice.fas.harvard.edu from Windows. "This document explains how to install and use SecureCRT, commercial software for Windows for which Harvard has a site license; it's installed on most PCs around campus and can also be installed on yours."
SVG

Add interactivity to your SVG. "Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based language for drawing two-dimensional graphics. However, its capabilities are not restricted to simple static vector shapes. This article shows how you can add interactive elements to your SVG documents that respond to user input."

An Introduction to Scalable Vector Graphics. By J. David Eisenberg.

Bring Scalable Vector Graphics to life with built-in animation elements. "Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based language for drawing two-dimensional graphics. Sound dull? Far from it. SVG has many exciting features available to it such as transformations, alpha masks, filter effects, and animation. This tip provides working examples to show you how to apply the five flavours of SVG animations to your SVG documents."

Interactive, dynamic Scalable Vector Graphics. "Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML application language which describes 2D vector graphics. SVG includes animation and scripting functionality. Scripting of SVG images provides powerful and flexible interactivity to add value to images on SVG-enabled Web sites. In addition, SVG images can be created dynamically from XML data, for example from an XML-enabled relational database management system, using XSLT and other technologies. This tutorial demonstrates the use of JavaScript to enable users to dynamically control the content and appearance of a floor plan rendered using SVG."

Introduction to Scalable Vector Graphics. "Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) makes it possible to specify, using text, graphical images that appear on a Web page. The advantages are many, including the ability to easily generate graphics (such as graphs and charts) from database information, and the ability to add animation and interactivity to graphics. This tutorial demonstrates the concepts necessary for building SVG documents, such as basic shapes, paths, text, and painting models, and also animation and scripting."

KevLinDev - Tutorials - SVG. Copyright 2000-2003, Kevin Lindsey.

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 1.1 Specification. W3C Recommendation, 14 January 2003.

SVG reference with examples. "Both the indexes and the examples were extracted from the SVG Candidate Recommendation and SVG DTD. . . . The reference will be upgraded when the standard is finalized. The examples were extracted programatically, so there can be some problems introduced during processing."

SVG Validation Service. "Validate an SVG document by URI. Validate an SVG document by uploading it from your computer."

W3Schools's SVG Tutorial. "Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) defines graphics in XML format. In our SVG tutorial you will learn about SVG."
Underground

London Underground History. This site is devoted to the 40-some abandoned and ghost tube stations on the London Underground, including accounts of guided tours.
Web Services

Apache Axis 1.0 Tutorial. "A comprehensive tutorial on Apache Axis 1.0."

A Web Services Primer. "Looking back over the last six years, it is hard to imagine networked computing without the Web. The reason why the Web succeeded where earlier hypertext schemes failed can be traced to a couple of basic factors: simplicity and ubiquity. From a service provider's (e.g. an e-shop) point of view, if they can set up a web site they can join the global community. From a client's point of view, if you can type, you can access services. From a service API point of view, the majority of the web's work is done by 3 methods (GET, POST, and PUT) and a simple markup language. The web services movement is about the fact that the advantages of the Web as a platform apply not only to information but to services...."

Java Web Services Tutorial, The. "A beginner's guide to developing Web services and Web applications on the Java Web Services Developer Pack."

XMethods. "Emerging web services standards such as SOAP, WSDL and UDDI will enable system-to-system communication that is easier and cheaper than ever before. This site is a 'virtual laboratory' for developers, listing publicly available web services and showcasing new ways this technology can be applied."
WSDL

W3Schools's WSDL Tutorial. "In our WSDL tutorial, you will learn what WSDL is."

Web Services Description Language (WSDL) Version 1.1. W3C Note, 15 March 2001.
XForms

Understanding XForms. "Today's Web applications require sophisticated control over a form's presentation and over the data that is ultimately submitted. XForms, currently at the level of Candidate Recommendation status at the W3C, aims to satisfy those needs, including separating functionality from presentation and streamlining validation and events processing."

W3Schools's XForms Tutorial. "XForms are the next generation of HTML Forms! In our XForms tutorial, you will learn how to prepare yourself for XForms, and how to start using XForms in your applications."

XForms 1.0. W3C Recommendation, 14 October 2003.
XHTML

Extensible HTML version 1.0 Transitional DTD. "This is the same as HTML 4 Transitional except for changes due to the differences between XML and SGML."

W3C's XHTML Validator. A free service that checks documents like HTML and XHTML for conformance to W3C Recommendations and other standards.

W3Schools's XHTML Tutorial. "XHTML is the next generation of HTML! In our XHTML tutorial you will learn the difference between HTML and XHTML, and how to use XHTML in your future applications."

XHTML 1.0: The Extensible HyperText Markup Language (Second Edition). W3C Recommendation, 26 January 2000. "A Reformulation of HTML 4 in XML 1.0."

Zvon's XHTML 1.0 Reference with Examples. "The indexes and most examples (with some editing) were extracted from the HTML 4.01 standard and XHTML 1.0 DTD's. (The revision from 1 August 2002 included)."
XInclude

XML Inclusions (XInclude) Version 1.0. W3C Working Draft, 10 November 2003. "This document specifies a processing model and syntax for general purpose inclusion. Inclusion is accomplished by merging a number of XML information sets into a single composite Infoset. Specification of the XML documents (infosets) to be merged and control over the merging process is expressed in XML-friendly syntax (elements, attributes, URI references)."
XLink

What is XLink?. "The very nature of the success of the Web lies in its capability for linking resources. However, the unidirectional, simple linking structures of the Web today are not enough for the growing needs of an XML world. The official W3C solution for linking in XML is called XLink (XML Linking Language). This article explains its structure and use according to the most recent Candidate Recommendation (July 3, 2000)."

XML Linking Implementations. "XLink Implementations."

XML Linking Language (XLink) Version 1.0. W3C Recommendation, 27 June 2001. "This specification defines the XML Linking Language (XLink), which allows elements to be inserted into XML documents in order to create and describe links between resources. It uses XML syntax to create structures that can describe links similar to the simple unidirectional hyperlinks of today's HTML, as well as more sophisticated links."
XML

Essential XML Quick Reference. "Addison-Wesley and Developmentor have provided TheServerSide.NET with the entire book of Essential XML Quick Reference for free download. Essential XML Quick Reference is for anyone working with today's mainstream XML technologies. It was specifically designed to serve as a handy but thorough quick reference that answers the most common XML-related technical questions.It goes beyond the traditional pocket reference design by providing complete coverage of each topic along with plenty of meaningful examples. Each chapter provides a brief introduction, which is followed by the detailed reference information."

Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.1. W3C Recommendation, 4 February 2004. "The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a subset of SGML that is completely described in this document. Its goal is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML. XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML."

Microsoft's XML Validator. "This sample web page allows you to enter in the URL of an XML document and both parse and validate that document."

W3Schools's XML Tutorial. "In our XML tutorial you will learn what XML is, and the difference between XML and HTML. You will also learn how to start using XML in your applications."

XML Files' XML Tutorial. "After you have studied this chapter you will know what XML is. You will know the difference between XML and HTML. You will also know how to start using XML in your browser and in your applications."

Zvon's XML Tutorial. "In this tutorial selected XML features are demonstrated on many examples."
XML Base

XML Base. W3C Recommendation, 27 June 2001. "This document proposes a facility, similar to that of HTML BASE, for defining base URIs for parts of XML documents."
XML Schema

Using W3C XML Schema. "This article is an introduction to using W3C XML Schemas, and also includes a comprehensive reference to the Schema datatypes and structures."

W3Schools's XML Schema Tutorial. "In our Schema tutorial, you will learn what an XML Schema is. You will also learn how XML Schema will replace DTD, and how to use the XML Schema language in your applications."

xFront's XML Schema Tutorial. "Last updated January 19, 2003."

XML Schema Part 0: Primer Second Edition. W3C Recommendation, 28 October 2004. "XML Schema Part 0: Primer is a non-normative document intended to provide an easily readable description of the XML Schema facilities, and is oriented towards quickly understanding how to create schemas using the XML Schema language. XML Schema Part 1: Structures and XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes provide the complete normative description of the XML Schema language. This primer describes the language features through numerous examples which are complemented by extensive references to the normative texts."

XML Schema Part 1: Structures Second Edition. W3C Recommendation, 28 October 2004. "XML Schema: Structures specifies the XML Schema definition language, which offers facilities for describing the structure and constraining the contents of XML 1.0 documents, including those which exploit the XML Namespace facility. The schema language, which is itself represented in XML 1.0 and uses namespaces, substantially reconstructs and considerably extends the capabilities found in XML 1.0 document type definitions (DTDs). This specification depends on XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes."

XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes Second Edition. W3C Recommendation, 28 October 2004. "XML Schema: Datatypes is part 2 of the specification of the XML Schema language. It defines facilities for defining datatypes to be used in XML Schemas as well as other XML specifications. The datatype language, which is itself represented in XML 1.0, provides a superset of the capabilities found in XML 1.0 document type definitions (DTDs) for specifying datatypes on elements and attributes."
XPath

TopXML's XSLT & XPath Tutorial. "The TopXML XSLT tutorial introduces you to the basics of XSLT concepts, syntax, and programming. Downloaded worksheets and software give you hands-on experience with XSLT code examples and programming tools."

W3Schools's XPath Tutorial. "XPath is a set of syntax rules for defining parts of an XML document. XPath is a major element in the W3C XSLT standard. Without XPath knowledge you will not be able to create XSLT documents."

XML Path Language (XPath) Version 1.0. W3C Recommendation, 16 November 1999. "XPath is a language for addressing parts of an XML document, designed to be used by both XSLT and XPointer."

XML Path Language (XPath) Version 2.0. W3C Recommendation, 23 January 2007. "XPath 2.0 is an expression language that allows the processing of values conforming to the data model defined in [the] XQuery/XPath Data Model (XDM)."

XPath Tutorial. "In this tutorial selected XPath features are demonstrated on many examples."
XPointer

XML Linking Implementations. "XPointer Implementations."

XPointer element() Scheme. W3C Recommendation, 25 March 2003. "The XPointer element() scheme is intended to be used with the XPointer Framework to allow basic addressing of XML elements."

XPointer Framework. W3C Recommendation, 25 March 2003. "This specification defines the XML Pointer Language (XPointer) Framework, an extensible system for XML addressing that underlies additional XPointer scheme specifications. The framework is intended to be used as a basis for fragment identifiers for any resource whose Internet media type is one of text/xml, application/xml, text/xml-external-parsed-entity, or application/xml-external-parsed-entity. Other XML-based media types are also encouraged to use this framework in defining their own fragment identifier languages."

XPointer tutorial. "The following set of examples should explain the concepts of XPointer."

XPointer xmlns() Scheme. W3C Recommendation, 25 March 2003. "The XPointer xmlns() scheme is intended to be used with the XPointer Framework to allow correct interpretation of namespace prefixes in pointers, for instance, namespace-qualified scheme names and namespace-qualified element or attribute names appearing within scheme data."

XPointer xpointer() Scheme. W3C Working Draft, 19 December 2002. "The XPointer xpointer() scheme is intended to be used with the XPointer Framework to provide a high level of functionality for addressing portions of XML documents. It is based on XPath, and adds the ability to address strings, points, and ranges in accordance with definitions provided in DOM 2: Range."
XQuery

Process XML using XML Query. "For years developers have been using SQL to retrieve data from structured sources such as relational databases. But what about unstructured and semi-structured sources, such as XML data? To be viable as a data source, XML needed a means for conveniently retrieving the data. XQuery provides this means, allowing developers to write a statement that both extracts data and (if necessary) structures the results as XML. This tutorial shows you how to use XQuery to retrieve information from an XML file. It also explains the ways in which XPath changes with version 2.0, and what those changes mean for data management."

W3Schools's XQuery Tutorial. "In this XQuery tutorial you will learn what XQuery is. You will learn how to use XQuery to extract data from your XML documents."

What is XQuery?. by Per Bothner; October 16, 2002

XML tutorial: XQuery. Information extraction and transformation.

XQuery 1.0: An XML Query Language. W3C Recommendation, 23 January 2007.
XSL-FO

Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) Version 1.1. W3C Recommendation, 5 December 2006. "This specification defines the features and syntax for the Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL), a language for expressing stylesheets. It consists of two parts: (1) a language for transforming XML documents, and (2) an XML vocabulary for specifying formatting semantics. An XSL stylesheet specifies the presentation of a class of XML documents by describing how an instance of the class is transformed into an XML document that uses the formatting vocabulary."

Printing from XML: An Introduction to XSL-FO. "One of the issues many users face when introduced to the production of print from XML is that of page layout. Without having the page layout right, its unlikely that much progress will be made. By way of introducing the W3C XSL Formatting Objects recommendation, I want to present a simplified approach that will enable a new user to gain a foothold with page layout. The aim of this article is to produce that first page of output -- call it the 'Hello World' program -- with enough information to allow a user to move on to more useful things. I'll introduce the most straightforward of page layouts for XSL-FO, using as few of the elements needed as I can to obtain reasonable output."

Using XSL FO with XEP 3.0. "This document gives a quick, learn-by-example introduction to XSL Formatting Objects. I don't discuss subtle details of implementation, but rather provide a series of examples of how to perform routine tasks with XEP--an XSL formatter developed by RenderX, Inc. It is not a manual of XSL FO in general, and some examples given here may not work in other XSL FO formatters, or give different results."

XSL-FO advanced techniques. "This intermediate-level tutorial shows advanced techniques for working with XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO) for formatting data, such as handling lists and tables, creating complex documents with multiple layouts, adding repeating elements, and converting HTML elements to formatting objects and thence to PDF documents. Examples include XSLT templates, FO samples, and PDF output files, all processed in Java with the Apache XML Project's Xalan XSLT processor and FOP (Formatting Objects to PDF) tool."

XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO) basics. "This tutorial teaches the basics of XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO), a powerful, flexible XML vocabulary for formatting data, often used with XSLT to convert XML and HTML documents to PDF (portable document format). The first of a two-part series, it uses XSLT to convert XML documents into formatting objects and then the Apache XML Project's FOP (Formatting Object to PDF) tool to convert those objects into PDF files. Examples include XSL-FO sample code, XSLT templates, and Java processing commands."
XSLT

Code generation using XSLT. "The automated generation of code, when applied correctly, can be a powerful engineering technique. This tutorial provides a basic introduction to code generation concepts, and in particular introduces XSLT as a code generation tool. The tutorial also discusses the limitations of XSLT when generating code, and demonstrates how to compensate for some of these issues using a flexible framework built with open source tools, such as Ant and Jalopy. This simple but powerful framework can be applied to the generation of many different types of code."

Controlling Whitespace, Part 1. "Over the next few columns, we'll discuss how XML and XSLT treat whitespace to gain a better understanding of what can happen, and we'll look at some techniques for controlling how an XSLT processor adds whitespace to the result document."

Controlling Whitespace, Part Three. "This month we'll see how to add tab characters to a result document, and how to automate the indenting of a result document according to the nesting of its elements."

Controlling Whitespace, Part Two. "This month we'll look at how xsl:text can not only add whitespace where you want it, but also make it easier to prevent unwanted whitespace characters from showing up in your result tree. We'll also look at a built-in XSLT function that lets you make the use of whitespace in your result tree more consistent."

TopXML's XSLT & XPath Tutorial. "The TopXML XSLT tutorial introduces you to the basics of XSLT concepts, syntax, and programming. Downloaded worksheets and software give you hands-on experience with XSLT code examples and programming tools."

W3Schools's XSLT Tutorial. "In our XSL tutorial you will learn what XSL is. You will also learn how to use XSL to transform XML documents into other formats, like HTML."

xFront's XSL Tutorial. "Last updated January 19, 2003."

XSL Transformations (XSLT) Version 1.0. W3C Recommendation, 16 November 1999. "This specification defines the syntax and semantics of XSLT, which is a language for transforming XML documents into other XML documents. XSLT is designed for use as part of XSL, which is a stylesheet language for XML. In addition to XSLT, XSL includes an XML vocabulary for specifying formatting. XSL specifies the styling of an XML document by using XSLT to describe how the document is transformed into another XML document that uses the formatting vocabulary. XSLT is also designed to be used independently of XSL. However, XSLT is not intended as a completely general-purpose XML transformation language. Rather it is designed primarily for the kinds of transformations that are needed when XSLT is used as part of XSL."

XSL Transformations (XSLT) Version 2.0. W3C Recommendation, 23 January 2007. "This specification defines the syntax and semantics of XSLT 2.0, a language for transforming XML documents into other XML documents. XSLT 2.0 is a revised version of the XSLT 1.0 Recommendation published on 16 November 1999."
 
Copyright © 2008, David J. Malan. Some rights reserved under Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States. Computer Science E-259's podcast is generously hosted by Switchpod.com.