Course listings as of August 25, 2015. Course offerings and times may change.
Please check the Website of the Registrar’s Office of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for updated information. https://courses.my.harvard.edu. Thank you!

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GENERAL EDUCATION /INTRODUCTORY CLASSES

CULTBLF 23 From the Hebrew Bible to Judaism, From the Old Testament to Christianity
Class Number: 13127 Course ID: 120880
Spring 2016
Shaye J.D. Cohen
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

The Hebrew Scriptures, what Christians call the ‘’Old Testament’’ and Jews call the ‘’Bible,’’ are the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through interpretation and re-interpretation, spawned two different cultural systems. Topics to be surveyed include: canon and prophecy; exegesis and Midrash; Shabbat and Sunday; temple, synagogue, church; the Oral Torah and the Logos; sin and righteousness; messiah and redemption.
Course Notes: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.
Class Notes: Occasional Fridays are required. Please check course syllabus for details.

CULTBLF 39 The Hebrew Bible
Class Number: 13458 Course ID: 125055
Fall 2015
Shaye J.D. Cohen
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

This course is a survey of the major books and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (commonly called the Old Testament). The course will also treat the historical contexts in which the Bible emerged, and the Bible’s role as canonical scripture in Judaism and Christianity.
Course Notes: All readings in translation. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.
Class Notes: Occasional Fridays are required. Please check course syllabus for details.

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BIBLICAL / ANCIENT NEAR EAST

ANE 103 Ancient Lives
Class Number: 15209 Course ID: 110014
Fall 2015
Gojko Barjamovic
TTh 11:30am-1:00pm

What are the essential elements of human society? Have our fundamental conditions developed, and how? Can we use themes from ancient history to think about contemporary society and culture? These questions are in focus in this course on ‘Ancient Lives’, which explores the earliest human civilizations in the region commonly known as Mesopotamia (c. 3000-300 BCE) in what is now Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey. Few elements in the way we live and organize ourselves today are to be taken for granted. There is, and has always been, a wealth of ways in which humans live. But biologically we are the same as our ancestors of 5000 years ago, at the dawn of history. Any likeness or difference between ‘us and them’ is therefore likely to be a product of history and culture. ‘Ancient Lives’ builds upon this realization to inspire a critical way of thinking about society in the broadest possible scope. Areas explored during the course are selected for their relevance across the range of contemporary life - they include freedom, music, public health, food, jurisprudence, trade, the visual arts, science, sexuality, religion and political power. You learn about how societies and individuals have dealt with change on multiple levels, from large-scale societal revolutions to personal transformation. Having taken this course, you will have gained a fundamental understanding and appreciation of human life in the broadest scope, as well as of your own life as a part of history. You will be able to critically assess contemporary discourses on the study of ‘the other’ in past and present; engage with core concepts of human society, such as justice, beauty, value and belief on a broad historical base; be familiar with examples of classical social theory and thinkers through concrete cases in which their work has been applied to or shaped by the study of the past; and acquire skills in presenting scholarly work to a general audience.
Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Societies of the World.

ANE 111 Law in the World of the Bible
Class Number: 15425 Course ID: 120820
Fall 2015
Peter Machinist
T 1:00pm-3:00pm

An examination of what law was and how it operated in ancient Israel through its primary expression in the Hebrew Bible. Attention to the wider contexts of law in the ancient Near East, especially Mesopotamia, in which biblical law originated, and to the legacy of biblical law in the subsequent traditions of early Judaism.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1129.

ANE 117 Biblical Archaeology
Class Number: 11355 Course ID: 156358
Fall 2015
Robert Homsher
T 2:00pm-4:00pm

This course combines biblical historiography and archaeology to critically evaluate many of the debatable incongruities between text and material evidence. Various periods of biblical history will be studied within their greater Near Eastern and Eastern Mediterranean context, looking specifically at results of archaeological excavations and evidence from extra-biblical textual sources. Beginning with the composition of biblical text and biblical chronology, readings and lectures will then navigate through biblical theories and archaeological evidence from the primordial creation stories until post-exilic Second Temple Judaism. Additionally, the history of “biblical archaeology” will be traced until the present day, especially including portrayals in popular media, while highlighting the good, the bad, and the very ugly.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1422.

ANE 120A Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament 1: Pentateuch and Former Prophets
Class Number: 12365 Course ID: 118849
Fall 2015
Andrew Teeter
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the first part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the major biblical narrative traditions, the Pentateuch and Former Prophets.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1102.

ANE 120B Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament 2: Latter Prophets and Writings
Class Number: 13688 Course ID: 126065
Spring 2016
Andrew Teeter
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the second part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the Latter Prophets and the Writings.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1103.

ANE 131 Readings in the Septuagint
Class Number: 10306 Course ID: 112752
Fall 2015
Richard Saley
TTh 12:00pm-1:00pm

This course aims to increase facility with Septuagint Greek by reading representative prose portions of the Septuagint and studying the peculiarities of the grammar inductively. The basics of Koine Greek will be reviewed as necessary.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4215.
Recommended Prep: One year of Greek.

ANE 222 History of the Study of the Hebrew Bible: From the Renaissance to the Present: Seminar
Class Number: 15426 Course ID: 144784
Fall 2015
Peter Machinist
Th 3:00pm-5:00pm

Surveys Hebrew biblical scholarship since the Renaissance, focusing on particular scholars and their representative and seminal works. The central theme is the emergence of and reactions to a historical-critical understanding of the Bible.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1425.
Recommended Prep: A background in the study of the Hebrew Bible. Recommended also is some acquaintance with biblical Hebrew and at least one of the following: French, German, modern Hebrew.

COMPLIT 258 Ancient Interpretation of the Bible
Class Number: 15772 Course ID: 160526
Spring 2016
David Stern
TTh 2:30pm-4:00pm

This is a course about READING; specifically about the different ways in which a single book, the Bible, has been read through the centuries, particularly in the ancient and early medieval periods by Jews and Christians. No book in the history of Western culture has been read more intensively that the Bible, and the main emphasis of the course will fall on close readings of major ancient Jewish and Christian interpreters of the Bible, with a view to considering their exegetical approaches historically as well as through the lens of contemporary critical and hermeneutical theory. We will also consider how the respective religious and theological beliefs of these interpreters shaped and were shaped by the ways they read Scripture. As a consequence, this will also be a course about the early development of Judaism and Christianity although the focus will always be on the interpretation of the bible. All readings will be in English translation, and will include Dead Sea Scrolls selections, Philo, Rabbinic Midrash and Medieval Jewish Commentaries, the New Testament, Origen and other early Christian commentators, Augustine, Luther, and as a concluding coda, Spinoza. The course is open to both undergraduates and graduate students; there will be extra sessions for the graduate students.
Course Notes: To be jointly offered with the Divinity School.

HEBREW 130 Scriptural Interpretation in Ancient Israel: Inner-Biblical Exegesis
Class Number: 16412 Course ID: 126069
Spring 2016
Andrew Teeter
T 4:00pm-6:00pm

An examination of the forms, methods, and aims of scriptural interpretation within the Hebrew Bible itself. Sessions will combine consideration of recent scholarship on “inner-biblical exegesis” with close readings of biblical texts (narrative, legal, prophetic, apocalyptic, hymnic) in Hebrew.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1308.
Recommended Prep: Two years of Biblical Hebrew strongly recommended.

HEBREW 205 The Psalms
Class Number: 15471 Course ID: 127212
Fall 2015
Michael Coogan
TTh 8:30am-10:00am

A study of the book of Psalms, with special attention to its structure, principal genres, and interpretation, as well as to its continuing liturgical and devotional uses. Close reading of selected psalms.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1107.

HEBREW 218 The Joseph Story and the Book of Esther: Seminar
Class Number: 15070 Course ID: 116498
Spring 2016
Jon Levenson
Th 4:00pm-6:00pm

A close critical reading of Genesis 37-50 and the Book of Esther in Hebrew. Emphasis on literary design and religious messages and on the influence of the story of Joseph upon the Book of Esther.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1802.
Recommended Prep: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent, and a good acquaintance with the historical-critical method.

HEBREW 245 The Book of Jeremiah: Composition and Reception
Class Number: 16567 Course ID: 160590
Fall 2015
Andrew Teeter
T 4:00pm-6:00pm

An examination of the shape and development of the Book of Jeremiah, including close reading of select portions in Hebrew, with attention to large scale strategies and elements of inner-scriptural interpretation. Some attention will also be given to representative selections illustrating the nature and scope of the differences between the Greek and Hebrew forms of the book (including Qumran fragments). The course will also consider the continued reception of the prophet and the book in a variety of other compositions, including Lamentations, Baruch, the Epistle of Jeremiah, and the Jeremiah Apocryphon.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1305.
Recommended Prep: Two years of Biblical Hebrew strongly recommended.

SEMPHIL 151 Introduction to Northwest Semitic Epigraphy
Class Number: 15878 Course ID: 127648
Fall 2015
Peter Machinist
W 12:00pm-2:00pm

Readings in Hebrew, Phoenician and other Northwest Semitic inscriptions with an introduction to methods and techniques of Northwest Semitic palaeography, and attention to problems of historical grammar.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1152.
Class Notes: Interested students please contact Matt Rasure, rasure@fas.harvard.edu.
Recommended Prep: Good working knowledge of Classical (Biblical) Hebrew.

SEMPHIL 220R Northwest Semitic Epigraphy: Seminar
Class Number: 10893 Course ID: 112083
Spring 2016
Andrew Teeter
TBA

Topic for 2015-16 to be determined.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1160.
Recommended Prep: Semitic Philology 151.

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CLASSICAL, RABBINIC, MEDlEVAL AND MODERN JEWISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE

COMPLIT 140 Catastrophe and Continuity in Jewish Literature from the Bible to Today
Class Number: 16017 Course ID: 160527
Fall 2015
David Stern
TTh 12:00pm-1:30pm

From the Bible until today, the theme of catastrophe has loomed large in Jewish literature. Why has God’s chosen people been made to undergo so many terrible ordeals and sufferings? This question has posed challenges in multiple dimensions -- theological, historiographical, literary -- and in this course we will consider the many different, often surprising (and overlooked) responses that have been given to these challenges in Jewish literature from the Biblical period through the Holocaust (and beyond). We will also consider the literary problem of the representation of catastrophe, the origins and development of martyrdom, and the history of Jewish responses to catastrophe as a tradition worthy of study in its own right. All readings will be in English translation, and will include Biblical and post-Biblical texts, Rabbinic sources, medieval chronicles, laments, and legal texts, and modern poetry, fiction, and theological writings. No previous experience in catastrophe required.

COMPLIT 277 Literature, Diaspora, and Global Trauma
Class Number: 12517 Course ID: 117360
Fall 2015
Karen Thornber
T 10:00am-12:00pm

Examines creative and critical discourse from and about the global African, Asian (Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese), and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian) diasporas. Focuses on the relationship among diaspora, migration, and trauma, and on the relationship between these phenomena and constructions of artistic and cultural identities, transculturation, translation, multilingualism, global history, and world literature.

EXPOS 20 215 Expository Writing 20
Class Number: 16518 Course ID: 116353
Fall 2015
Janling Fu
TTh 11:00am-12:00pm

EXPOS 20 216 Expository Writing 20
Class Number: 16519 Course ID: 116353
Fall 2015
Janling Fu
TTh 12:00pm-1:00pm

An intensive seminar that aims to improve each student’s ability to discover and reason about evidence through the medium of essays. Each section focuses on a particular theme or topic, described on the Expos Website. All sections give students practice in formulating questions, analyzing both primary and secondary sources and properly acknowledging them, supporting arguments with strong and detailed evidence, and shaping clear, lively essays. All sections emphasize revision.

Topic: Who Owns the Past?

Course Notes: Students must pass one term of Expository Writing 20 to meet the College’s Expository Writing requirement.
Class Notes: Our culture’s most iconic archaeologist is the glamorous Indiana Jones—a steely-eyed swashbuckler who cracks his leather bullwhip and fearlessly (with the exception of snakes) raids tombs for priceless relics. But who really are archaeologists and what do they actually do as discoverers and curators of the past? In our first unit, we will consider the rights and problems revolving around the passage of NAGPRA (The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) and in particular its relation to Harvard’s famous Peabody Museum. How is this significant piece of legislation, which argues for the return of objects to tribes in the United States, viewed by those Native American tribes, museums, and archaeologists themselves? In our second unit, we grapple with the very mission of archaeology. How do archaeologists think about the process of collecting data--often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant--and then its interpretation? How much can archaeologists claim to know about the human past? To help us frame this question we will replicate an experiment done by archaeologists in studying designs on tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard. In our final unit, students will probe the ways in which political regimes use archaeology to legitimate a version of the past they favor. We will touch upon contradictory and competing narratives of the past between Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany’s use of archaeology to justify the values of the Third Reich, and Saddam Hussein’s appeals to history to glorify his reign.

HEBREW 243 Critical Study of Midrash
Class Number: 15981 Course ID: 160490
Fall 2015
David Stern
W 2:00pm-5:00pm

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the contemporary critical study of midrash, the literature of classical Rabbinic Biblical interpretation. We will be primarily concerned with two questions: 1) How did the Rabbis read the Bible? and 2) What can midrash, as a form of literary discourse in its own right, tell us about its authors, the Rabbinic sages who lived in the first five centuries in the common era? We will also compare midrash to other types of ancient Jewish interpretation, discuss the various hermeneutical and literary theoretical issues that have figured in recent scholarship, and consider its place in the history of Jewish Biblical exegesis. Texts to be read will run the entire gamut of Rabbinic literature (including both Tannaitic and Amoraic collections, and midrash halakhah as well as midrash aggadah). All readings will be in the original language, and students are expected to be able to read unpointed Hebrew texts (although pointed texts will be supplied whenever possible). No other previous background in Rabbinic literature is required.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1832.
Recommended Prep: Students are expected to be able to read unpointed Hebrew texts. No other previous background in Rabbinic literature is required.

JEWISHST 157 The Binding of Isaac in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Tradition
Class Number: 15727 Course ID: 160491
Spring 2016
David Stern
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

The Akeidah, or the Binding of Isaac, as told in Genesis 22, is one of the great Biblical stories and the foundation for one of the great themes of Western religion, the near-sacrifice and restoration of the beloved son. The story is also one of the most enigmatic texts in all Biblical literature, and a source for countless later re-tellings and re-imaginings in later Jewish, Christian, and Islamic literature. In this course, we will study the history of this narrative, its interpretation, and reception from the Bible through the contemporary period in order to show how a Biblical tradition develops and changes in response to historical and cultural change. The focus will be on Jewish tradition but we will also read Greco-Roman, Christian and Islamic parallels because, as we shall see, no religious tradition in Western culture has ever developed in a vacuum. In this way, we will also attempt to understand the very nature of Tradition-- the process by which the past is received and handed on to future generations-- as it figures in Judaism and Western culture in general. All readings will be in English translation; texts will include Biblical selections, Euripides, Hellenistic Jewish and Rabbinic works, medieval chronicles and commentaries, early Christian and Islamic sources, Kierkegaard, Kafka, and other modern prose and poetry including contemporary American and Israeli prose and poetry.

JEWISHST 170 Job and the Problem of Suffering
Class Number: 15317 Course ID: 126059
Spring 2016
Michael Coogan
TBA

An examination of the book of Job and its poetic treatment of the human condition. The course will also consider other biblical and ancient Near Eastern texts that deal with the issue of evil in the world from a religious perspective, and later readings and retellings of Job by Frost, MacLeish, Wiesel, Fackenheim, and others.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1106.

MOD-HEB 241R Advanced Seminar in Modern Hebrew: Israeli
Culture: Cinema & Literature
Class Number: 13953 Course ID: 127670
Fall 2015
Irit Aharony
TTh 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course constitutes the final level of Modern Hebrew language studies. The course offers representative readings and screenings from contemporary Israeli literature and cinema, and it forms bases of discussion on major cultural and linguistic themes through academic readings. We will focus on the theme of the family in Israeli culture and relationships between fathers and sons in “Far away Islands”; “Book of Intimate Grammar”; the new series “Shtissel”; and more.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4045. Not open to auditors. Discussions, papers, movies and texts presented only in Hebrew.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 130b or equivalent.

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JEWISH STUDIES, SOCIOLOGY AND POLITICS

AFRAMER 180X Race, Class and the Making of American Religion
Class Number: 14574 Course ID: 127784
Fall 2015
Marla Frederick
T 1:00pm-3:00pm

This class explores the ways in which both race and class are implicated in the development and practice of religion in the U.S. Through historical, anthropological and sociological works we explore the theoretical underpinnings of race and class and ponder their influence upon varying expressions of Islam, Judaism and Christianity.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 2599.

AFRAMER 198X Scientific Racism: A History
Class Number: 11090 Course ID: 110497
Fall 2015
Alejandro de la Fuente
W 10:00am-12:00pm

This course focuses on the history of “race” as a category of difference and explores why “race” has become a globally-accepted idiom to classify humans. It assesses the prominent roles that science and scientists have played in the process of naturalizing “race” and analyzes how “scientific” theories of race were developed and disseminated globally in the modern period. We trace the formation of these ideas in the North Atlantic, their diffusion to various areas of the world, and the manner in which cultural and political elites adopted or challenged them. We will devote considerable time to the emergence of eugenics, the science of racial improvement, in Europe, the Americas, and Africa and study the process of institutionalization of this science in Nazi Germany and elsewhere, including the United States. A final section of the course discusses the impact of contemporary science on ideas of race. Students in this class will work with texts and archival materials related to these scientists, some of whom were Harvard faculty.

GOV 94OF Law and Politics in Multicultural Democracies
Class Number: 14113 Course ID: 128009
Fall 2015
Ofrit Liviatan
T 2:00pm-4:00pm

Examines the role of law in the governance of cultural diversity drawing on examples from the USA, Western Europe, India and Israel. Central themes at the intersection of law and politics will be explored, including: the impact of courts on rights protections, law’s function as a venue of conflict resolution, and courts’ relationship with other political institutions. Specific attention will be given to contemporary controversies such as Islamic veiling, abortion and same sex marriage.

GOV 1219 Arab-Israeli Conflict
Class Number: 15309 Course ID: 159678
Fall 2015
Marjorie Sa’Adah
TTh 1:00pm-2:00pm

In this course, we will examine the several dimensions and levels (domestic, international) of the ongoing crisis in, around, and about Israel/Palestine. In what ways is the Arab-Israeli conflict central to broader political patterns in the region, and why has it proven so intractable? How have the various parties to the conflict defined its stakes, understood their interests, viewed their adversaries, mobilized support, and formulated policy? What possibilities does the future hold?
Class Notes: comparative_subfield

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RELIGION

RELIGION 13 Scriptures and Classics
Class Number: 14438 Course ID: 110957
Spring 2016
William A. Graham
TTh 9:00am-10:00am

An introduction to the history of religion through selective reading in significant, iconic texts from diverse religious and cultural traditions. Considers important themes (e.g., suffering, death, love, community, transcendence) as well as problems of method and definition as they present themselves in the sources considered. Readings from texts such as the Upanisads, Bhagavad Gita, Dhammapada, Lotus Sutra, Analects, Chuang Tzu, Gilgamesh, Black Elk Speaks, Aeneid, Torah,
Talmud, New Testament, and Qur’an.
Class Notes: Course has additional section hour to be arranged.

RELIGION 25 Judaism: Text and Tradition
Class Number: 10712 Course ID: 110003
Spring 2016
Jon Levenson
TTh 11:30am-1:00pm

An exploration of the Jewish religious tradition, from its inception in biblical Israel through its rabbinic, medieval, and modern iterations, with a focus on central theological claims and religious practices. Readings concentrate on classical sources and their various modes of interpretation but also include modern restatements, reformulations, and critiques of tradition.
Course Notes: Open only to undergraduates.
Class Notes: Course has additional section hour to be arranged.

RELIGION 112A Dreams and the Dreaming
Class Number: 14891 Course ID: 115684
Fall 2015
Kimberley Patton
W 2:00pm-4:00pm

Considers the dream as initiatory experience, metaphor for aboriginal time, gateway to the other world, venue for the divine guide, healing event, “royal road” to the unconscious, quest or journey, epistemological paradox, or omen of the personal or collective future. Theories of dreaming, the religious history of dream interpretation, and dreams in myth and ritual will be examined cross-culturally, including the theological and spiritual dimensions of human dreaming. Focus during the first semester is on ancient Greece, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; recent research on American dreams.
Class Notes: Additional hour to be arranged.

HDS 2024 The Veil in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam
Class Number: 15998 Course ID: 160504
Fall 2015
Susanna Drake
M 12:00pm-2:00pm

This course examines the role of veiling in societies from the ancient Near East to the present. We will pay special attention to veiling as a cultural and religious practice, and we will consider the function of the veil in contemporary political debates and as a topic in feminist discourse.

HDS 2825 Religion, Conflict, and Peace
Class Number: 10059 Course ID: 104594
Fall 2015
Diane Moore
Th 12:00pm-2:00pm

In this course, we will explore a series of contemporary conflicts in different regions of the world with a special focus on identifying and analyzing the diverse and complex roles that religions play in both promoting and mitigating violence in each context. Students will learn a method for recognizing and analyzing how religious ideologies are embedded in all arenas of human agency and not isolated from political, economic, and cultural life as is often assumed. In addition to examining the conflicts themselves, we will also explore the religious dimensions of the impacts those conflicts have on civic life in areas such as public health, education, and commerce. What roles do religions play in fostering violence and what roles do they play in promoting peace? How do religious institutions and ideologies function to support and/or thwart public health initiatives? What are the ideological justifications for functional economic policies and how do they reflect and/or challenge diverse religious values? What roles do religions play in advancing or suppressing educational opportunities and for whom? Are media representations of the religious dimensions of conflict accurate? Possible countries of focus include Brazil, Egypt, France, Israel/Palestine, Myanmar, Nigeria, Qatar, the Philippines, Somalia, Syria, Turkey, and the United States. Final projects will be individually shaped based on interest and (where relevant) professional focus. Outstanding student work may be considered for publication on the Religious Literacy Project website at Harvard Divinity School. The course is open to all and especially relevant for aspiring or professional educators, journalists, public health workers, foreign service officers and government officials who wish to better understand how religions function in contemporary world affairs. Professionals from those fields will make guest presentations throughout the term.

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CLASSICAL AND MODERN HEBREW LANGUAGE COURSES

CLAS-HEB AA Elementary Classical Hebrew
Class Number: 15189 Course ID: 123023
Fall 2015
Peter Machinist
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

A thorough and rigorous introduction to Biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010A. Classical Hebrew AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

CLAS-HEB AB Elementary Classical Hebrew
Class Number: 15027 Course ID: 159881
Spring 2016
Jon Levenson
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

Continuation of Classical Hebrew AA. A thorough and rigorous introduction to Biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010B. Classical Hebrew AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

CLAS-HEB 120A Intermediate Classical Hebrew I
Class Number: 15798 Course ID: 116431
Fall 2015
Andrew Teeter
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

Readings in prose books; review of grammar.
Course Notes: Jointly offered with the Divinity School as 4020.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew AA/AB sequence or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 120B Intermediate Classical Hebrew II
Class Number: 14569 Course ID: 123873
Spring 2016
Andrew Teeter
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

Readings in prose and poetic books; review of grammar.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4021.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew 120A or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 130AR Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew I
Class Number: 15800 Course ID: 122692
Fall 2015
Andrew Teeter
Th 1:00pm-3:00pm

Advanced reading in selected biblical prose texts and intensive review of the grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1625.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew AA/AB sequence, CH 120A, and 120B, or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 130BR Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew II
Class Number: 14597 Course ID: 122693
Spring 2016
Jon Levenson
Th 1:00pm-3:00pm

Advanced reading in selected biblical poetic texts and intensive review of the grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1626.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew 130A or equivalent.

MOD-HEB BA Elementary Modern Hebrew
Class Number: 15335 Course ID: 114218
Fall 2015
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 10:00am-11:00am

The course introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4015A. Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Modern Hebrew BA/BB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

MOD-HEB BB Elementary Modern Hebrew
Class Number: 15178 Course ID: 159988
Spring 2016
Irit Aharony
MTWTh 10:00am-11:00am

The course introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4015B. Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

MOD-HEB 120A Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
Class Number: 16750 Course ID: 110947
Fall 2015
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 11:00am-12:00pm

The course reinforces and expands knowledge of linguistic and grammatical structures, with emphasis on further developing the four skills. Readings include selections from contemporary Israeli literature, print media, and internet publications. Readings and class discussions cover various facets of Israeli high and popular culture. Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4040. Modern Hebrew B or passing of special departmental placement test.
Course Notes: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4040.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew BA/BB sequence or passing of special departmental placement test.

MOD-HEB 120B Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
Class Number: 11902 Course ID: 111756
Spring 2016
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 11:00am-12:00pm

Continuation of Hebrew 120A.
Course Notes: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4041.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 120A.

MOD-HEB 130A Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Class Number: 12769 Course ID: 119630
Fall 2015
Irit Aharony
MW 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course constitutes the third year of the Modern Hebrew language sequence. The course emphasizes the development of advanced proficiency in all skills. Readings include texts of linguistic and cultural complexity that cover contemporary Israeli literature and culture.
Course Notes: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4042.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 120A/120B sequence, or equivalent level of proficiency.

MOD-HEB 130B Advanced Modern Hebrew II
Class Number: 14101 Course ID: 126531
Spring 2016
Irit Aharony
MW 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 130a. Texts, films, and other materials expose students to the richness and complexity of the contemporary sociolinguistics of Israeli society.
Course Notes: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4043.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 130A, or equivalent level of proficiency.

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YIDDISH COURSES

YIDDISH AA Elementary Yiddish
Class Number: 15175 Course ID: 114058
Fall 2015
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 10:00am–11:00am

Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and through it, to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include selections from both secular and religious Yiddish literature; Yiddish jokes, songs, and proverbs; and films of Jewish life past and present. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional sections at different times may be added as needed. Yiddish AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Class Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.

YIDDISH AB Elementary Yiddish
Class Number: 15009 Course ID: 159871
Spring 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 10:00am–11:00am

Continuation of Yiddish AA. Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and through it, to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include selections from secular and religious Yiddish literature; Yiddish jokes, songs, and proverbs; and films of Jewish life past and present. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional sections at different times may be added as needed. Yiddish AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

YIDDISH BA Intermediate Yiddish I
Class Number: 12981 Course ID: 119874
Fall 2015
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 11:00am–12:00pm

Further development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Introduction to the main Yiddish dialects: Central (“Polish”), Southeastern (“Ukrainian”), and Northeastern (“Lithuanian/Belorussian”). Course materials include selections from Yiddish fiction, poetry, drama, films, songs, the press, and private correspondence—from the late nineteenth century to the present. Visits by native Yiddish speakers.
Course Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish AA/AB sequence, or equivalent.

YIDDISH BB Intermediate Yiddish II
Class Number: 13063 Course ID: 119875
Spring 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 11:00am–12:00pm

Continuation of Yiddish BA.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish BA or permission of the instructor.

YIDDISH CA Advanced Yiddish I
Class Number: 12772 Course ID: 123432
Fall 2015
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 1:00pm–2:30pm

Emphasis on building advanced vocabulary with a special focus on the etymological diversity of Yiddish. Further development of writing, reading, speaking, and oral comprehension; and continued exploration of Yiddish dialects. Introduction to various styles of Yiddish literature, journalism, and folklore, including present-day sources from both secular Yiddish culture and the Yiddish-speaking religious communities of New York, Jerusalem, London, Antwerp, and elsewhere. Ample use of audiovisual materials. Visits by native Yiddish speakers.
Course Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish BB or permission of the instructor.

YIDDISH CB Advanced Yiddish II
Class Number: 15691 Course ID: 124883
Spring 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 1:00pm–2:30pm

Continuation of Yiddish CA.
Course Notes: Instructor: Yuri Vedenyapin
Recommended Prep: Yiddish CA or permission of the instructor.

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HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

Custom and Legal Authority: Advanced Topics in Jewish Law and Legal Theory
Professor Noah Feldman
Fall 2015 Reading Group
Meeting Time: Th 7:00pm - 9:00pm in WCC Room 5048
1 classroom credit

Professor Noah Feldman
Spring 2016 Reading Group
Meeting Time: Th 7:00pm - 9:00pm
1 classroom credit

Prerequisite: This reading group will be by permission of the instructor, who strongly prefers that students have a background in advanced study of Jewish legal material. To apply please send a short statement of interest including background in Jewish legal studies to nfeldman@law.harvard.edu with a copy to swhalen@law.harvard.edu.
Exam Type: No exam.

The group will examine sociological questions of the Yeshiva world as well as theoretical/textual ones regarding what is studied, and how, and by whom.

Note: The reading group will meet on the following dates: TBD.

Subject Areas: International, Comparative & Foreign Law

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This publication is for informational purposes only.  The listing of a course in this online
directory does not necessarily imply endorsement by the Center for Jewish Studies,
nor does the absence of a course necessarily imply the lack of endorsement.
The goal of this publication is to aid the process of course selection by students interested
in Jewish Studies, and we apologize for inadvertent inclusions and exclusions.

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