THE COURSES LISTED BELOW, AS OF 9/12/2013, ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY FAS REGISTRAR'S WEBSITE FOR ANY AND ALL UP-TO-DATE CHANGES OR CANCELLATIONS. THANK YOU!

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GENERAL EDUCATION /INTRODUCTORY CLASSES

Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding 29. Modern Jewish Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 1250
Spring 2014
Ruth R. Wisse (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; Comparative Literature)
Eitan Lev Kensky (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged.

Great works of fiction become universal and remain able to surprise, delight, inform, or otherwise overwhelm current readers. What gives them this power? How do writers become adjectives like Babelian, Bellovian, or Kafkaesque? This course moves through the twentieth century through the literature of a multilingual people, with works in Hebrew, Yiddish, German, Russian, Italian, and English. We see how various Jewish writers interpret modern history and their own situation within it.

Culture and Belief 23 (formerly Literature and Arts C-70). From the Hebrew Bible to Judaism, From the Old Testament to Christianity
Harvard College/GSAS: 5275
Spring 2014
Shaye J.D. Cohen (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged.

The Hebrew Scriptures, what Christians call the “Old Testament” and Jews call the “Bible,” are the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through interpretation and re-interpretation, spawned two different cultural systems. Topics to be surveyed include: canon and prophecy; exegesis and Midrash; Shabbat and Sunday; temple, synagogue, church; the Oral Torah and the Logos; sin and righteousness; messiah and redemption.
Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts C.

Culture and Belief 27 Among the Nations: Jewish History in Pagan, Christian and Muslim Context
Harvard College/GSAS: 2338
Fall 2013
Rachel L. Greenblatt (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M. 1-3, and a weekly section to be arranged.

Can we trace an “authentic” Jewish identity through history, as distinct from many “cultures” of Jews in the multitude of times and places in which they have lived? This course provides an overview of major trends in Jewish civilization from biblical times through the early modern era (to approximately the 17th century), with this and related questions in mind, by engaging in close readings of traditional Jewish sources on the one hand and seeking contextual understandings of Jews and Judaism within various non-Jewish settings on the other.
Note: Required of all secondary concentrators in Jewish Studies, unless excused by the DUS. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts C.

Culture and Belief 39 (Formerly Literature and Arts A-93) The
Hebrew Bible
Harvard College/GSAS: 9783
Fall 2013
Shaye J.D. Cohen (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged.

This course is a survey of the major books and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (commonly called the Old Testament). The course will also treat the historical contexts in which the Bible emerged, and the Bible’s role as canonical scripture in Judaism and Christianity.
Note: All readings in translation. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed.
This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.
This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the Core area requirement for Literature and Arts A.

Religion 25. Introduction to Judaism (new course)
Catalog Number: 34366
Spring 2014
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 12, and a weekly section to be arranged.

An introduction to the Jewish religious tradition, from its inception in biblical Israel though its rabbinic, medieval, and modern iterations, with a focus on central theological claims and religious practices. Readings concentrate on classical sources and their various modes of interpretation but also include modern restatements, reformulations, and critiques of tradition.

Societies of the World 35. Conditional Equality: The Case of the Jews of Europe in Modern Times
Harvard College/GSAS: 88298
Fall 2013
Jay M. Harris (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged

This course is a study in the relations between majorities and minorities in modern Europe, using the Jews as a focus. It will examine the ways in which the equal status of a minority is negotiated through cultural and political interaction, both subtle and blunt. It will further focus on the role that such negotiations have in the formation of identities of both the majority and the minority. Finally, it will examine the ways in which majorities can exercise control over minorities rendering them conditionally rather than fully equal participants in the national projects of the age.

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BIBLICAL / ANCIENT NEAR EAST

Ancient Near East 100. History of the Ancient Near East
Harvard College/GSAS: 0702/Divinity School: 1115
Spring 2014
Instructor to be determined
Meeting Time: M., W., at 2.
This course provides an overview of the history of the ancient Near East, with a focus on ancient Mesopotamia. It begins with the advent of writing in the late fourth millennium BCE and ends with the fall of Babylon to Cyrus the Great, in 539 BCE. The course combines archaeological, art historical, and textual data to explore the extraordinarily rich history of this region.

Ancient Near East 103. First Cities (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 65695
Spring 2014
Gojko Barjamovic (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

An introduction to the political and social history of the first cities of the Near East, as well as their legacy in later tradition. Topics include state formation, political and religious thought, law and diplomacy, writing and education, production and technology, trade and economy, gender and childhood, art and architecture, music and literature, magic and the sciences. The course integrates a broad range of archaeological, art historical, and textual evidence from the Near East to explore these issues, and offers a broad methodological and historiographic survey of the problems involved in the study of ancient societies.

Ancient Near East 120A. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament 1: Pentateuch and Former Prophets
Harvard College/GSAS: 6544/ Divinity School: 1102
Fall 2013
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 10-11:30.

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the first part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the major biblical narrative traditions, the Pentateuch and Former Prophets.

Ancient Near East 120B. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament 2: Latter Prophets and Writings
Harvard College/GSAS: 22968/ Divinity School: 1103
Spring 2014
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., at 10-11:30, and a section to be arranged.

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the second part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the Latter Prophets and the Writings.

Ancient Near East 128. Ancient Egypt and the Hebrew Bible/Old
Testament (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 28008/Divinity School: 1122
Fall 2013
Bernd Schipper (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 12–2.

The quest for the cultural influence of Pharaonic Egypt on the Hebrew Bible is as old as scholarly interest in the Bible itself. Starting with ancient historians such as Herodotus or Diodorus, and extending from the Renaissance era up to the present, scholars have been searching for traces of Egypt in the literature of the Hebrew Bible. This lecture course begins with a brief overview of cultural contacts, investigating the connections between various pieces of literature such as Psalm 104 and the Egyptian Hymn to Aten, Proverbs 22-24 and the Instruction of Amenemope, as well as less well-known literature like Psalm 20 and an Aramaic-Demotic Papyri from Ptolemaic Egypt, or the ‘Apocalyptic’ Prophecy of the Potter and the Oracle on Egypt in Isaiah 19.

Ancient Near East 131. Readings in the Septuagint
Harvard College/GSAS: 3661/Divinity School: 4215
Fall 2013
Richard J. Saley
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., at 12.

This course aims to increase facility with Septuagint Greek by reading representative prose portions of the Septuagint and studying the peculiarities of the grammar inductively. The basics of Hellenistic Greek will be reviewed as necessary.
Prerequisite: One year of Greek.

Hebrew 236. Song at the Sea: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 6496/ Divinity School: 1816
Fall 2013
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 2–4.

A close reading of Exodus 13:17-15:21 in the context of the Hebrew Bible together with its ancient Near Eastern background. Ample Hebrew readings in this block of material and parallel biblical texts.
Prerequisite: An introductory course in the critical study of the Hebrew Bible and a solid command of Hebrew grammar (any period).

Jewish Studies 168. Eighth-Century Prophets
Harvard College/GSAS: 14062/Divinity School: 1104
Spring 2014
Michael D. Coogan (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 8:30-10.

A close examination of the books of Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah 1-39, in their historical and social contexts.

Religion 13. Scriptures and Classics (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 54506
Fall 2013
William Alber Graham
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

An introduction to the history of religion through selective readings in significant, iconic texts from diverse religious and cultural traditions. Considers important themes (e.g., suffering, death, love, community, transcendence) as well as problems of method and definition as they present themselves in the sources considered. Readings from texts such as the Upanisads, Bhagavad Gita, Dhammapada, Lotus Sutra, Analects, Chuang Tzu, Gilgamesh, Black Elk Speaks, Aeneid, Torah, Talmud, New Testament, and Qur’an.

Semitic Philology 151. Introduction to Northwest Semitic Epigraphy
Harvard College/GSAS: 2858/Divinity School: 1152
Fall 2013
John L. Ellison and staff
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

Readings in Hebrew, Phoenician and other Northwest Semitic inscriptions with an introduction to methods and techniques of Northwest Semitic palaeography, and attention to problems of historical grammar.
Prerequisite: Good working knowledge of Classical (Biblical) Hebrew.

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ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY/ RABBINIC LITERATURE


Hebrew 226R. Seminar in Jewish Studies
Harvard College/GSAS: 42458
Fall 2013
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

An overview of the methods, questions, and controversies in the field of Jewish Studies over the last two centuries. Topic for 2013-14: Mishnah Eduyot and the beginnings of the Mishnah, with special attention to the history of scholarship and issues of method.
Prerequisite: Facility in reading rabbinic Hebrew. Permission of the instructor required for all students.

Hebrew 238. Readings in Midrash: Seminar (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 36275/ Divinity School: 3678
Fall 2013
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 2–4.

Close reading in Hebrew of selections from the Mekhilta de-Rabbi Ishmael with the goal of understanding the nature of biblical interpretation in rabbinic Judaism and the shape of rabbinic theology.
Prerequisite: Three years of college level Hebrew (any period) or the equivalent.

Jewish Studies 149. Topics in the Dead Sea Scrolls: Exegesis at Qumran
Harvard College/GSAS: 54969/Divinity School: 1309
Spring 2014
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 1-3.

This course explores the diverse functions of scripture within the literature of the Dead Sea Scrolls, focusing in particular on the forms and methods of interpretation attested, considered in light of other varieties of interpretation in early Judaism. Sessions will be devoted to reading, translation and discussion of primary sources in Hebrew, as well as to discussion of relevant secondary literature.
Prerequisite: Two years of Biblical Hebrew strongly recommended.

Jewish Studies 207. Rewriting Scripture in Jewish Antiquity: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 9572/Divinity School: 1302
Enrollment: Limited to 15
Fall 2013
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 4-6.

A study of the exegetical literature of so-called rewritten Bible texts from the Second Temple period, considered in relation to the received Hebrew Bible and its later interpretive traditions. Examination of exegetical techniques, aims, and presuppositions, with attention to higher level compositional strategies, underlying conceptions of scripture/scriptural authority, and the dynamics of canon formation. Primary sources will include, among others: the book of Jubilees, the Temple Scroll, Reworked Pentateuch, the Genesis Apocryphon, as well as selected prophetic and hymnic exemplars.
Prerequisite: Ability to read (unpointed) Hebrew.

Religion 98. Readings in Babylonian Talmud
Harvard College Junior Tutorial
Fall 2013
Shoshana Razel Gordon Guedalia (ThD Candidate Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Two-hour block weekly. Day and hours to be arranged.

The Talmud represents the very lynchpin around which Jewish literary and religio-legal culture revolves, articulating this culture along the journey from its Biblical origins, through its rabbinical curriculum, through its narrative depiction of lived religion, even as this text rambles delightfully in and out of literary forms—from the conversational give-and-take, to the near deadly legal argumentative, to the hagiographic, to the prescriptive, etc… Its text continues to be fleshed out, interpreted and reinterpreted, from early medieval times up unto this very day, even as the Talmud had come to interpret and expand upon the Mishnah before it. Its topics range from matters of religious ritual, to commercial law, to dream interpretation, and so on. Classroom time will be devoted to close readings of select passages in translation to be tackled together in classic Chavruta style—lively back-and-forth discussion—while questions of historical context and literary style will be addressed through assigned readings of secondary sources.

Selections will be chosen in consultation with students, while topics will likely include matters of; Theology, Family and Sexuality, Women and Gender, Legal Methodologies, Demonology and Magic, and the relationship between Law and Lore, and between realms supposedly rational and those mystical. Students of any religious background are welcome to address resonances with their own particular canons of expertise or familiarity in comparative papers, if they so wish.
Enrollment limit: 1-3 Harvard College Juniors.

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MEDIEVAL AND MODERN JEWISH HISTORY

History 60E (formerly History 1025). Overlapping Spheres: Jewish Life in Early Modern Europe
Harvard College/GSAS: 76199
Fall 2013
Rachel L. Greenblatt (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

Examining primary and secondary sources (relating to c. 1500-1750), we will
consider multiple aspects of the ways Jews lived among their Christian neighbors peacefully, antagonistically and in myriad combinations of those poles--during this exciting crossroads between traditional society and the beginnings of what came to be called, “modernity,” an age that included the wide-scale adoption of movable-type print, increasing use of the written vernacular, changing gender roles, Protestant challenges to Catholic hegemony and the rise of capitalism, absolutism and toleration.

History 1083. American Jewish History (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 52092
Spring 2014
Jonathan D. Sarna (Brandeis University)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

A history of American Jews and Judaism from the colonial period to the present, with particular emphasis on the various streams of American Judaism, Judaism’s place in American religion, and comparisons to Judaism in other countries.

Jewish Studies 80. American Jews and the Television Age
Harvard College/GSAS: 84167
Spring 2014
Rachel L. Greenblatt (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

Examines the involvement of Jews in American mass entertainment, especially television, during the 20th century. At a time when Jews were active in both the business and creative ends of the new media that came to dominate fields as seemingly diverse as popular culture and political discourse, Jewish leading characters were largely absent from prime-time network television. Are there relationships among Jewish involvement in mass entertainment, the simultaneous absence of Jewish characters onscreen, and the role of television in American culture?

Jewish Studies 235R. Historical Consciousness and the Jewish Historical Imagination (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 24588
Spring 2014
Rachel L. Greenblatt (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

This seminar, designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, will introduce participants to current research and debates on questions of Jewish historiography and historical consciousness. At its core will be attendance at the regular meetings of the Harvard Center for Jewish Study’s Starr Seminars for Spring 2014, in which six visiting fellows will present papers on their current research on this theme.
Note: Supplementary course meetings designed for the students will focus on core literature in this field and enable student participants to discuss material and arguments presented by the fellows. Students will prepare final research papers of their own.

Modern Hebrew 241BR. Advanced Seminar in Modern Hebrew: Israeli Culture
Harvard College/GSAS: 6949
Spring 2014
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M., W., 1–2:30.

This course constitutes the final level of Modern Hebrew language studies. The course offers representative readings and screenings from contemporary Israeli literature and cinema, and it forms a basis of discussion on major cultural and linguistic themes through academic readings.
Note: Discussions, papers, movies and texts presented only in Hebrew. Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 130B or equivalent.

Religion 1255. Selected Works of Twentieth-Century Jewish
Theology

Harvard College/GSAS: 49889/FAS: 1255
Fall 2013
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

A close reading of selected works of Jewish theology from the twentieth century, with special attention to the questions of God, Torah, and Israel in light of modernity and to the thinkers’ understanding of Christianity in relation to Judaism. Authors read will be drawn mostly from the following: Baeck, Buber, Rosenzweig, Kaplan, Soloveitchik, Berkovitz, Heschel, Fackenheim, and Wyschogrod.

Yiddish 130. Three Centers of Yiddish Culture (new course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 95148
Fall 2013
Ruth R. Wisse and Eitan Lev Kensky
Meeting Time: Tu., 2-4. Additional section to be arranged.

In 1926, the Yiddish novelist Dovid Bergelson announced the “three centers” of Yiddish literature and culture: New York, Warsaw and Moscow. Using Bergelson’s essay as a window on Yiddish modernism, this class looks at the relationship between language, city, and state. We will ask, what distinguished Yiddish culture in one place from another? Did writers see themselves at home or in exile? How did politics affect the Yiddish writer? And what should we make of the other Yiddish centers, Vilna, Kiev, even Berlin?
Note: This class is intended for students with a reading knowledge of Yiddish, though all texts will be available in English translation. Class discussion will be in English. There will be an extra section for Yiddish readers.

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LANGUAGES

Classical Hebrew A. Elementary Classical Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 8125/ Divinity School: 4010
Full Year 2013-2014
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: M., W., F., at 10.

A thorough and rigorous introduction to biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory.

Classical Hebrew 120A. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 5545/ Divinity School: 4020
Fall 2013
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School) and members of the Department
Meeting Time: M., W., F., at 10.

Readings in prose books; review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew A or equivalent.

Classical Hebrew 120B. Intermediate Classical Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 8494/ Divinity School: 4021
Spring 2014
D. Andrew Teeter (Divinity School) and members of the Department
Meeting Time: M., W., F., at 10.

Readings in prose and poetic books; review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew 120A or equivalent.

Classical Hebrew 130AR. Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 7895/ Divinity School: 1625
Fall 2013
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 1–3.

Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew A, 120A, and 120B, or equivalent.

Classical Hebrew 130BR. Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 7896/ Divinity School: 1626
Spring 2014
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 1–3.

Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew 130AR or equivalent.

Classical Hebrew 138. Historical Grammar of Biblical Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 4415
Spring 2014
Instructor to be determined
Meeting Time: Day and hours to be arranged.

This course will trace the changes in Hebrew grammar in its ancient phases through the study of inscriptional, biblical, and extra-biblical texts.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew 130AR and 130BR or equivalent.

Modern Hebrew B. Elementary Modern Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 4810/Divinity School: 4015
Full Year 2013-2014
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., at 10.

The course introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture.
Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Cannot divide for credit.

Modern Hebrew 120A. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 1711/Divinity School: 4040
Fall 2013
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., at 11.

The course reinforces and expands knowledge of linguistic and grammatical structures, with emphasis on further developing the four skills. Readings include selections from contemporary Israeli literature, print media, and internet publications. Readings and class discussions cover various facets of Israeli high and popular culture.
Note: Conducted primarily in Hebrew.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew B or passing of special departmental placement test.

Modern Hebrew 120B. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 2563/Divinity School: 4041
Spring 2014
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., at 11.
Continuation of Hebrew 120A.

Note: Conducted primarily in Hebrew.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 120A.

Modern Hebrew 130A (formerly Modern Hebrew 125A). Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 4985/Divinity School: 4042
Fall 2013
Irit Aharony and assistant
Meeting Time: M., W., 1–2:30.

This course constitutes the third year of the Modern Hebrew language sequence. The course emphasizes the development of advanced proficiency in all skills. Readings include texts of linguistic and cultural complexity that cover contemporary Israeli literature and culture.
Note: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 120A, 120B, or equivalent level of proficiency.

Modern Hebrew 130B (formerly Modern Hebrew 125B). Advanced Modern Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 28788
Spring 2014
Irit Aharony and assistant
Meeting Time: M., W., 1–2:30.

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 130A. Texts, films, and other materials expose students to the richness and complexity of the contemporary sociolinguistics of Israeli society.
Note: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 130A, or equivalent level of proficiency.

Hebrew 135. Introduction to Rabbinic Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 83659/ Divinity School: 4036
Fall 2013
Instructor to be determined
Meeting Time: M., W., 9–10:30.

Introduction to Tannaitic and Amoraic Hebrew with readings from Talmudic and Midrashic literature.
Prerequisite: Two semesters or the equivalent of Hebrew, preferably biblical.

Yiddish A. Elementary Yiddish
Harvard College/GSAS: 4623
Full Year 2013-2014
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 10.

Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include rich selections from Jewish humor, Yiddish songs, and films of Jewish life past and present.
Note: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.

Yiddish BA. Intermediate Yiddish I
Harvard College/GSAS: 6023
Fall 2013
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., at 11.

Further development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Introduction to features of the main Yiddish dialects: Polish/Galician, Ukrainian/Volhynian, and Lithuanian/Belorussian. Course materials include selections from modern Yiddish fiction, poetry, songs, the press, and private letters, as well as pre-WWII and contemporary Yiddish films. Occasional visits from native Yiddish speakers.
Note: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Prerequisite: Yiddish A or equivalent.

Yiddish BB. Intermediate Yiddish II
Harvard College/GSAS: 1239
Spring 2014
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., at 11.

Continuation of Yiddish BA.
Prerequisite: Yiddish BA or permission of the instructor.

Yiddish 200r. Modern Yiddish Literature: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 4263/Divinity School: 3719
Fall 2013 and Spring 2014
Ruth R. Wisse
Meeting Time: Th., 2–4.

An examination of 20th century Yiddish literature from between the world wars, emphasizing the transition from a religiously centered to a largely secular outlook. Materials will be read in Yiddish and the class will be conducted in English.
Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of Yiddish required.

 

 

 
 

 

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This publication is for informational purposes only.  The listing of a course in this online
directory does not necessarily imply endorsement by the Center for Jewish Studies,
nor does the absence of a course necessarily imply the lack of endorsement.
The goal of this publication is to aid the process of course selection by students interested
in Jewish Studies, and we apologize for inadvertent inclusions and exclusions.

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