THE COURSES LISTED BELOW, AS OF 9/4/2014, ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY FAS REGISTRAR'S WEBSITE FOR ANY AND ALL UP-TO-DATE CHANGES OR CANCELLATIONS. THANK YOU!

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GENERAL EDUCATION /INTRODUCTORY CLASSES

Culture and Belief 23. From the Hebrew Bible to Judaism, From the Old Testament to Christianity
Harvard College/GSAS: 5275
Spring 2015
Shaye J.D. Cohen (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged.

The Hebrew Scriptures, what Christians call the “Old Testament” and Jews call the “Bible,” are the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through interpretation and re-interpretation, spawned two different cultural systems. Topics to be surveyed include: canon and prophecy; exegesis and Midrash; Shabbat and Sunday; temple, synagogue, church; the Oral Torah and the Logos; sin and righteousness; messiah and redemption.
Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

Culture and Belief 27. Among the Nations: Jewish History in Pagan, Christian and Muslim Context
Harvard College/GSAS: 2338
Spring 2015
Jay M. Harris (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., F., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged.

Can we trace an “authentic” Jewish identity through history, as distinct from many “cultures” of Jews in the multitude of times and places in which they have lived? This course provides an overview of major trends in Jewish civilization from biblical times through the early modern era (to approximately the 17th century), with this and related questions in mind, by engaging in close readings of traditional Jewish sources on the one hand and seeking contextual understandings of Jews and Judaism within various non-Jewish settings on the other.
Note: Required of all secondary concentrators in Jewish Studies, unless excused by the DUS. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

Culture and Belief 39. The Hebrew Bible
Harvard College/GSAS: 9783
Fall 2014
Shaye J.D. Cohen (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.) at 10, and a weekly section to be arranged.

This course is a survey of the major books and ideas of the Hebrew Bible
(commonly called the Old Testament). The course will also treat the historical contexts in which the Bible emerged, and the Bible’s role as canonical scripture in Judaism and Christianity.
Note: All readings in translation. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed.
This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

United States in the World 32. The World’s Religions in Multicultural America: Case Studies in Religious Pluralism
Harvard College/GSAS: 8833 Enrollment: Limited to 56.
Spring 2015
Diana L. Eck (South Asian Studies; Study of Religion)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11:30-1, and a weekly section to be arranged.

An exploration of the dynamic religious landscape of the US with special focus on Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and Sikh traditions in the most recent period of post-1965 immigration. How are faith and freedom negotiated in a more complex society? In what contexts do minority religious communities encounter long-dominant Christian and Jewish communities? How is America changing as religious communities struggle with civic, constitutional, ethical, and theological issues, especially in the post-9/11 period? Readings, films, discussion, and class projects will focus on particular cases and controversies.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3847. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for United States in the World or Culture and Belief, but not both.

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FRESHMAN SEMINARS

Freshman Seminar 42k. Comparative Law and Religion
Harvard College/GSAS: 9992 Enrollment: Limited to 12.
Spring 2015
Ofrit Liviatan
Meeting Time: M., 2-4.

Investigates the use of legal processes in addressing religion-based conflicts, a leading source of tension in modern societies. The seminar will explore theoretical approaches tp accomomdating religious diversity and examine existing models of religion-state relationships. Drawing on legal cases from the US, Turkey, India, Is-
rael, Spain, Canada, and England, the seminar will also familiarize participants with contemporary debates involving religion: the wearing of Islamic headscarf, religion and education, the funding of religious institutions, etc.

Freshman Seminar 49g. The Holocaust, History and Reaction
Harvard College/GSAS: 1208 Enrollment: Limited to 15.
Fall 2014
Kevin J. Madigan (Divinty School)
Meeting Time: W., 1-3.

Approaches Nazi persecution of European Jewry from several disciplinary perspec-
tives. Presents background and narrative of the Holocaust, introduces the use of primary historical sources, and studies some of the major historiographical debates. Evaluates religious and theological reactions to the Holocaust -- uses literary, cinematic, and theological sources. Considers the role played by the Protestant and Catholic churches and theologies in the Holocaust. Assesses role played by the Holocaust in today’s world, specifically in the United States.

Note: Both seminars open to Freshman Only.

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BIBLICAL / ANCIENT NEAR EAST

Ancient Near East 113. Environmental Archaeology of the Ancient Near East - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 91925
Spring 2015
Robert Homsher (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Th., 2-4, with occasional labs to be arranged.

This course deals with major changes in climate and environment affecting humans, and the various ways in which Near Eastern societies have endured, mastered, or destroyed themselves from an ecological perspective. Importance is placed on a diachronic outlook on dynamic human-environment interactions as understood through archaeology, particularly with reference to the challenge of sustainability in the so-called Anthropocene. A major focus of this course will be on case studies from around the eastern Mediterranean and greater Near East during the Holocene, but particularly dealing with examples from the Levant (modern Israel/Palestine, Syria, southern Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan). Topics will cover different types of environments and geological processes found in the Near East, practical sampling and analytical procedures, and major categories of anthropological interpretation.
Note: Ancient Near East 115 and/or Anthropology 1010 are helpful, but certainly not essential, as background.

Ancient Near East 115. Archaeology of the Levant
Harvard College/GSAS: 2813
Fall 2014
Robert Homsher (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11:30-1.

This course follows human societies in the region of the Levant (modern Israel/Palestine, Syria, southern Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan) from the earliest sedentary communities through the Iron Age. This extensive survey through time focuses on current archaeological research, emphasizing major aspects of: geography and chronology, art and architecture, modes of social organization, explanations for major socio-cultural changes, social identity, domestic life, religious expression, and issues of gender. Societies and areas under investigation include: the Canaanites, Amorites, Phoenicia, Philistia, Israel, Judah, Aram, the Neo-Hittites, Ammon, Moab, Edom, and Arabia.
Note: Enrolled students will have the opportunity to participate in a one-week tour led by the instructor of sites in Israel spanning these chronological periods in summer 2015.

Ancient Near East 117. Biblical Archaeology
Harvard College/GSAS: 1371
Fall 2014
Robert Homsher (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., 2-4.

This course combines biblical historiography and archaeology to critically evaluate many of the debatable incongruities between text and material evidence. Various periods of biblical history will be studied within their greater Near Eastern and Eastern Mediterranean context, looking specifically at results of archaeological excavations and evidence from extra-biblical textual sources. Beginning with the composition of biblical text and biblical chronology, readings and lectures will then navigate through biblical theories and archaeological evidence from the primordial creation stories until post-exilic Second Temple Judaism. Additionally, the history of “biblical archaeology” will be traced until the present day, especially including portrayals in popular media, while highlighting the good, the bad, and the very ugly.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1422.

Ancient Near East 120. Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures
Harvard College/GSAS: 17184
Fall 2014
Michael D. Coogan (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 10-11:30.

A survey of the Hebrew Scriptures as viewed in their historical and cultural setting in the ancient Near East and as interpreted by modern scholarship, with attention to this literature as an expression of the religious thought of Israel and one of the formative influences on Western civilization.
Note: May not be taken for credit if the student has taken ANE 120a or ANE 120b for credit. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1101.

Ancient Near East 126. History of the Religion of Ancient Israel
Harvard College/GSAS: 1672
Fall 2014
Peter Machinist (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., (F.), 10-11.

The study of ancient Israelite religion and culture in comparative historical context. Topics examined include conceptions of divinity, prophecy, law, kingship, and cult. Through such topics the aim is to see how Israel related to other cultures of the ancient Near East and, thus, of what value the study of the other cultures has in understanding the character of Israelite religion itself.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1110.

Ancient Near East 132. Ancient Jewish Wisdom Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 9522
Spring 2015
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11:30-1.

A close critical reading and interpretation of works thought to derive from the Wisdom tradition of ancient Israel, through the Second Temple period. The workings of the world and the ways of God as they appear in works such as Proverbs, Job, Qohelet, Ben Sira, some Psalms, the Wisdom of Solomon, Fourth Maccabees, and Pseudo-Phocylides as well as narratives about such figures as Joseph, Esther, and Daniel. Egyptian and Mesopotamian antecedents and parallels briefly considered. Emphasis on matters of worldview and literary form.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1416.
Prerequisite: Ancient Near East 120a or an equivalent introduction to the historical-critical study of the Hebrew Bible.

Ancient Near East 134. Genesis: Narrative Artistry and Theological Meanings
Harvard College/GSAS: 3291
Fall 2014
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11:30-1.

A close critical reading in English of the book of Genesis with an eye both to the storytellers’ techniques and to the moral and theological dimensions of the text. Emphasis will be given to literary and religious rather than historical and editorial issues.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1417.

Ancient Near East 136. Sibling Rivalries: Israel and the Other in the Hebrew Bible - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 57242 Enrollment: Limited to 20.
Spring 2015
Joel Kaminsky (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 2-4.

This course will provide an in-depth examination of the biblical idea of divine election, that is, the notion that God specially favors certain individuals and nations, a notion that sits at the heart of ancient Israel’s theological self-understanding. Beginning with the narratives of sibling rivalry in Genesis and then turning to other relevant texts from the Hebrew Bible (all read in English), as well as on occasion from the Apocrypha, the New Testament, and rabbinic literature, we shall explore how the Hebrew Bible conceives of election, what it entails for those chosen, and what the Hebrew Bible’s election theology implies about the three-way relationship among God, Israel, and the nations of the world, and conclude by surveying how early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism each appropriated ancient Israel’s election theology in unique but related ways.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1790.

Ancient Near East 142. The Bible Uncensored: Journeys into Texts Dark and Daring from the Hebrew Bible - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 81386
Spring 2015
Peter Machinist (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 11-12.

Not your usual introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Through a close study of biblical texts (in translation) that are at once strange, shocking, raw, even bawdy, this course aims to reveal the variety and excitement of biblical literature and the ancient Israel that lies behind it.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1828.

Ancient Near East 210. Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 5492
Fall 2014
Richard J. Saley (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 3-6.

This course focuses on the art of recovering the text of the Hebrew Bible using Hebrew and Greek manuscripts as well as other early textual witnesses.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1819.
Prerequisite: At least two years of Hebrew and one year of Greek; some knowledge of Aramaic, Latin, and Syriac is helpful but not required.

Hebrew 235. The Binding of Isaac (Aqedah): Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 0170
Fall 2014
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 4-6.

An examination of Genesis 22 and its afterlife in ancient Judaism, early Christianity, and the Qur’an. Ample consideration of the interpretation and expansion of the story in modern theology and of critical responses to the story.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1808.
Prerequisite: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent, and acquaintance with historical critical methods.

Hebrew 239. Exodus 2 in Three Contexts: Seminar - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 23835
Spring 2015
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 4-6.

A close critical reading of the account of the early life of Moses in three contexts: (1) the Hebrew Bible and the ancient Near Eastern world in which it took shape; (2) rabbinic Judaism in Late Antiquity; and (3) medieval Jewish commentary. Texts to be read in Hebrew include Exodus 2 and a selection of rabbinic midrashim and medieval commentaries on it.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1826.
Prerequisite: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent (not a course for those lacking a secure grasp of Hebrew grammar).

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ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY/ RABBINIC LITERATURE

Hebrew 200r. Problems in the Literature, History, and Religion of Ancient Israel: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 3265
Fall 2014
Peter Machinist and others
Meeting Time: Th., 3-5.

Topic for 2014-15 TBA; topic for 2013-14 was “Current scholarship on the formation of the literature of the Hebrew Bible."
Note: Primarily for doctoral students in Hebrew Bible. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1810.
Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of biblical Hebrew. Acquaintance with other relevant ancient and modern languages desirable.

Hebrew 213b. Tannaitic Literature - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 48373
Spring 2015
Jay M. Harris
Meeting Time: W., 4-6.

An in-depth textual analysis of the Sifra, its exegetical techniques, and its relation to other rabbinic documents.
Prerequisite: Knowledge of rabbinic Hebrew.

Hebrew 226r. Seminar in Jewish Studies
Harvard College/GSAS: 42458
Fall 2014
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Meeting Time: Hours to be arranged.

An overview of the methods, questions, and controversies in the field of Jewish Studies over the last two centuries.
Prerequisite: Facility in reading rabbinic Hebrew. Permission of the instructor required for all students.

Hebrew 239. Exodus 2 in Three Contexts: Seminar - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 23835
Spring 2015
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., 4-6.

A close critical reading of the account of the early life of Moses in three contexts: (1) the Hebrew Bible and the ancient Near Eastern world in which it took shape; (2) rabbinic Judaism in Late Antiquity; and (3) medieval Jewish commentary. Texts to be read in Hebrew include Exodus 2 and a selection of rabbinic midrashim and medieval commentaries on it.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1826.
Prerequisite: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent (not a course for those lacking a secure grasp of Hebrew grammar).

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MODERN JEWISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Jewish Studies 200r. Guided Readings in Jewish History
Harvard College/GSAS: 4478
Fall 2014
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Meeting Time: M., 1-3.

Topic for 2010-11: Boundaries and Identities. Readings of Jewish texts, ancient to modern, that deal with the question of the Other and the Self: what is the boundary between Jews and non-Jews, and between Judaism and non-Judaism? Topic for 2014-15 to be determined.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3709. Required of all entering graduate students in Jewish Studies; open to others with the permission of the instructor.

Jewish Studies 300. Reading and Research in Jewish Studies
Harvard College/GSAS: 1544
Fall 2014
Jay M. Harris and Shaye J.D. Cohen

The Modern Middle East 125. Culture and Society in Contemporary Israel - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 37025
Fall 2014
Susan M. Kahn
Meeting Time: W., 1-3.

This course uses a variety of methodological approaches to explore the multidimensional nature of contemporary Israeli culture and society. Conventional and alternative narratives of the Israeli experience will be illuminated by analyzing a variety of texts, including literature, film and ethnography. Careful attention to historical and social contexts will amplify these explorations. The goal of the course is to give students a range of scholarly tools to explore central questions about Israeli culture and social life.
Note: Course taught in English; no Hebrew necessary.

The Modern Middle East 128. The Arab-Israeli Conflict - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 65595
Spring 2015
Rachel Fish (Brandeis University)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11:30-1.

This course examines the historical narratives and dynamics of the Arab-Israeli conflict, both in terms of the conflicts between Israel and the neighboring Arab states and the particular struggle between Israel and the Palestinians. Through the exploration of primary sources and interrogation of parallel narratives, students will encounter the history and contemporary politics of the Arab-Israeli and Palestinian-Israeli conflicts.

Literature 147. “Why the Jews?”: The Modern Jewish Experience in Literature - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 85633
Fall 2014
Dara Horn
Meeting Time: M., 2-4.

By the numbers, the Jews should be no better known than the Quecha people of Peru. Yet their outsize role in the Western imagination has made the Jewish experience, and its literary expression, into a fascinating case study of the intersection of language, culture and identity. This course will provide background on literary genres rooted in the Jewish religious tradition, and examine 19th, 20th and 21st century works that refine, reject, and reinvent them, introducing students to the tumultuous history of modern Jewish culture. Authors include Sholem Aleichem, Franz Kafka, S.Y. Agnon, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Amos Oz, Saul Bellow, Etgar Keret and others.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding.

Literature 193. “What’s Love Got to Do With It”; Love Poetry of the Middle Ages and Early Modernity
Harvard College/GSAS: 60925
Spring 2015
Luis M. Girón Negrón
Meeting Time: W., 3-5.

Does love have a history? The course explores the literary history of love poetry in Europe and the Middle East from the Middle Ages through the 17th century. Reading selections from Latin and Romance love lyric (Provencal, Galician-Portuguese, French, Catalan, Spanish, the `jarchas’), Arabic and Hebrew muwashshahat, the Italian dolce stil novo, Sufi and Christian mystical poetry, the Petrarchan sonnet and its heirs (Portugal, England, Spain), Dante’s Vita Nuova and erotic narrative verse (Juan Ruiz, Ibn Hazm, `Roman de la Rose’). Discussions framed by overview of premodern theories of love and recent scholarly debates on the origins of amour courtois.

Comparartive literature 252. The Literatures of Medieval Iberia
Harvard College/GSAS: 38202
Spring 2015
Luis M. Girón Negrón
Meeting Time: Hours to be arranged.

The cultural interactions in premodern Spain between Muslims, Christians and Jews shaped the literary history of Arabic, Hebrew and the Ibero-Romance vernaculars. Our seminar examines selected scholarly debates on the comparative study of these literatures.

Expository Writing 20.078. Jewish Identity in American Culture
Harvard College/GSAS: 54207
Spring 2015
Jane A. Rosenzweig
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 11-12.

This course will examine representations of Jews in American culture and the evolution of Jewish-American culture since World War II, as well as how shifts in the cultural conversation about minorities in America have affected our understanding of Jewish identity. We will question how recent works of literature, art, film, and television challenge and reinforce Jewish stereotypes, and how they continue to shape our ideas about assimilation, the Holocaust, ethnicity, and religious practice in America.

Expository Writing 20.233. Who Owns the Past?
Harvard College/GSAS: 64885
Fall 2014
Janling L. Fu
(Half course) Meeting Time: Tu., Th., at 11-12. EXAM GROUP: 9
Expository Writing 20.234. Who Owns the Past?
Harvard College/GSAS: 62896
Fall 2014
Janling L. Fu
(Half course) Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 12-1. EXAM GROUP: 9

What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.
Note: There are two offerings of this half course for the fall term.

Expository Writing 20.226. Who Owns the Past?
Harvard College/GSAS: 54641
Spring 2015
Janling L. Fu
(Half course) Meeting Time: M., W., 10-11. EXAM GROUP: 5

What does it mean for archaeologists to discover and curate the past? We will consider the rights and problems around the passage of legislation arguing for the return of objects to Native American tribes in the United States. We will grapple with the very mission of archaeology as we study tombstones in Harvard’s own backyard, investigating the challenges faced by archaeologists as they collect and interpret often apparently scant, fragile, and historically distant data. We will probe how political regimes use archaeology to legitimate versions of the past, examining cases in Israel and Palestine, Nazi Germany, and Saddam Hussein’s regime.

Government 94of. Law and Politics in Multicultural Democracies
Harvard College/GSAS: 14911
Fall 2014
Ofrit Liviatan
Meeting Time: M., 2-4.

Examines the role of law in the governance of cultural diversity drawing on examples from the USA, Western Europe, India and Israel. Central themes at the intersection of law and politics will be explored, including: the impact of courts on rights protections, law’s function as a venue of conflict resolution, and courts’ relationship with other political institutions. Specific attention will be given to contemporary controversies such as Islamic veiling, abortion and same sex marriage.

Government 1732. The Origins of Modern Wars
Harvard College/GSAS: 7668
Spring 2015
Stephen Martin Walt (Kennedy School)
Meeting Time: M., W., 10-11.

This course explores the causes of war. It examines the different theories that have been devised to explain organized violence between states (or groups seeking to control a state), and evaluates these competing theories by exploring several major conflicts of the past 100 years: World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the recent wars in the Persian Gulf. The course also considers the phenomenon of ethnic conflict, the implications of nuclear weapons and the question of whether large-scale war is becoming “obsolescent.”

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RELIGION

Religion 1019. Women, Gender and Religion in Colonial North America and the United States - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 63761
Spring 2015
Catherine A. Brekus (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 10-11:30.

This course is an introduction to the history of women, gender, and religion in America. We will ask several related questions. How have religious communities shaped understandings of gender and sexuality? How have individuals used religious beliefs, texts, and practices to defend or criticize gender norms? Why has religion in America often been perceived as “feminine”? Among other topics, we will discuss conceptions of femininity and masculinity in early America, the ideology of “Republican motherhood” during the American Revolution, controversies over female preaching in the nineteenth century, Fundamentalist attitudes toward gender, and twentieth-century debates over contraception, women’s ordination, and homosexuality. We will discuss a wide variety of religious communities in the United States, including Protestants, Catholics, Mormons, Spiritualists, Jews, Muslims, and Buddhists.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School 2181.

Religion 1414. Gospel Stories of Women
Harvard College/HDS 1503
Spring 2015
Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza
Meeting Time: Tu., 12-2 and hour to be arranged.

This course will engage a critical feminist reading of NT texts in order to assess whether they are “good news” for wo/men. Special attention will be given to a feminist hermeneutics of imagination. Discussion will focus on the significance of social location, critical methods, and historical imagination for the interpretation and significance of these stories about Jewish wo/men, for contemporary religious self-understanding and ministerial praxis. Lectures, group discussions, and group projects seek to foster a participatory democratic style of learning.
Note: Course has additional hour to be arranged. Offered jointly with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as Religion 1414.

Religion 1842. Religion, Gender, Identity: Readings in Arab and Muslim Autobiography: Seminar
Harvard College/GSAS: 4518
Fall 2014
Leila N. Ahmed (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 2-4.

We will read autobiographical works mainly by 20th century ‘Arab’ writers, Muslim, Christian and Jewish, paying particular attention to issues of religion, gender and identity, exploring how these are at play in the texts and in authorial constructions of self, history, and meaning.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3616.

Religion 2840. Twenty-First Century Middle Eastern Diasporic Memoirs in the West - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 39858
Spring 2015
Leila N. Ahmed (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 2-4.

We will read contemporary autobiographical works by Western authors of ‘Arab’ and Iranian heritage - Christian, Jewish, and Muslim - paying particular attention to issues of religion, gender and identity, and to exploring how these are at play in the texts and in authorial constructions of self, history, and meaning.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3583.

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SLAVIC

Slavic 160. Intersection of Polish and Jewish Culture - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 91865
Spring 2015
Jessie Labov
Meeting Time: M., 12-2.

A survey-style course that recreates several major moments of intersection between Polish and Jewish literatures. Both of these categories can be understood as placeholders for larger constellations of culture: from the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to the Ashkenazic Pale. Starting with the medieval ghetto, the presence/absence of Polish Jews in Polish cultural memory forms one line of inquiry; Polin as a present/absent homeland in Jewish thought from the 16th through 21st centuries forms another. These two cultures have been intertwined for longer than they have been considered separately; we read them in order to place them once again in dialogue.
Note: All texts taught in English translation. Any knowledge of Polish, Hebrew, or Yiddish a plus.

Slavic 194. The Austro-Hungarian Grotesque - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 27619
Spring 2015
Jessie Labov
Meeting Time: Th., 12-2.

Reconstructs a historical context for the literary/visual aesthetic of the Austro-Hungarian grotesque. Focuses on the period 1867-1918, while also mapping psychoanalysis and the subconscious onto later, surrealist incarnations of the grotesque in the twentieth century. Special attention paid to the role of Jewish culture and other margins of empire. How are the history, theory, and affect of the grotesque determined by spatial and/or social peripherality? How is the nascent sense of identity of small nations and minor literatures informed in turn by the grotesque? Text include: Andric, Csath, Freud, Hasek, Kafka, Musil, von Rezzori, Roth, Sacher-Masoch, Schnitzler, Schulz, Svevo.
Note: All texts taught in English translation; students with any knowledge of BCS, Czech, German, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Ukrainian, or Yiddish are especially encouraged to enroll.

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MUSIC

Music 193rs. Topics in Music from 1800 - Present - (New Course)
Harvard College/GSAS: 29408
Spring 2015
Tamar Barzel
Meeting Time: M., 2-4.

Music, Identity, and Radical Poetics. This course will explore the radical poetics of meaning developed by twentieth-century composer/improvisers, with a focus on the AACM, Asian improv, queercore, and Radical Jewish Culture scenes. Drawing on jazz’s performance practices, these artists developed provacative ways of conceptualizing heritage, memory and identity, while transforming the ostensibly “unmarked” sound world of experimental music. With attention to the politics of gender, race and authenticity, we will engage their work through close listening, small-group discussions, and readings in critical theory and ethnomusicology. Students will conduct research projects (historical or ethnographic), culminating in a paper or combined paper-performance.
Prerequisite: One course in music theory/composition or jazz history, or permission of instructor.

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CLASSICAL AND MODERN HEBREW LANGUAGE COURSES

Classical Hebrew A. Elementary Classical Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 8125
Full Year
Peter Machinist
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 10-11.

A thorough and rigorous introduction to Biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010.

Classical Hebrew 120a. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 5545
Fall 2014
Peter Machinist and members of the Department
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 10-11.

Readings in prose books; review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew A or equivalent.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4020.

Classical Hebrew 120b. Intermediate Classical Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 8494
Spring 2015
Peter Machinist and members of the Department
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 10-11

Readings in prose and poetic books; review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew 120a or equivalent.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4021.

Classical Hebrew 130ar. Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 7895
Fall 2014
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 1–3.

Advanced reading in selected biblical prose texts and intensive review of the grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1625.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew A, 20A, and 120B, or equivalent.

Classical Hebrew 130br. Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 7896
Spring 2015
Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School)
Meeting Time: Th., 1–3.

Advanced reading in selected biblical poetic texts and intensive review of the grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1626.
Prerequisite: Classical Hebrew 130AR or equivalent.

Modern Hebrew B. Elementary Modern Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 4810
Full Year
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., 10-11.

The coung rse introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developireading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4015. Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Cannot divide for credit.

Modern Hebrew 120a. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 1711
Fall 2014
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., at 11.

The course reinforces and expands knowledge of linguistic and grammatical structures, with emphasis on further developing the four skills. Readings include selections from contemporary Israeli literature, print media, and internet publications. Readings and class discussions cover various facets of Israeli high and popular culture.
Note: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4040.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew B or passing of special departmental placement test.

Modern Hebrew 120b. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 2563
Spring 2015
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: M. through F., 11-12.

Continuation of Hebrew 120A.
Note: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4041.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 120A.

Modern Hebrew 130a. Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Harvard College/GSAS: 4985
Fall 2014
Irit Aharony and assistant
Meeting Time: M., W., 1–2:30.

This course constitutes the third year of the Modern Hebrew language sequence. The course emphasizes the development of advanced proficiency in all skills. Readings include texts of linguistic and cultural complexity that cover contemporary Israeli literature and culture.
Note: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4042.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 120A, 120B, or equivalent level of proficiency.

Modern Hebrew 130b. Advanced Modern Hebrew II
Harvard College/GSAS: 28788
Spring 2015
Irit Aharony and assistant
Meeting Time: M., W., 1-3.

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 130A. Texts, films, and other materials expose students to the richness and complexity of the contemporary sociolinguistics of Israeli society.
Note: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4043.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 130A, or equivalent level of proficiency.

Modern Hebrew 241r. Advanced Seminar in Modern Hebrew: Israeli Culture: Cinema & Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 6949
Fall 2014
Irit Aharony
Meeting Time: Tu., Th., 1-3.

This course constitutes the final level of Modern Hebrew language studies. The course offers representative readings and screenings from contemporary Israeli literature and cinema, and it forms bases of discussion on major cultural and linguistic themes through academic readings. We will focus on the theme of the family in Israeli culture and relationships between fathers and sons in “Far away Islands”; “Book of Intimate Grammar”; the new series “Shtissel”; and more.
Note: Discussions, papers, movies and texts presented only in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4045.
Prerequisite: Modern Hebrew 130b, or equivalent level of proficiency.

Hebrew 135. Introduction to Rabbinic Hebrew
Harvard College/GSAS: 83659
Spring 2015
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Meeting Time: Hours to be arranged.

Introduction to Tannaitic and Amoraic Hebrew with readings from Talmudic and Midrashic literature.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity school is 4036
Prerequisite: Two semesters or the equivalent of Hebrew, preferably biblical Hebrew.

Hebrew 300. Hebrew Language and Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 7831
Jon Levenson (Divinity School) 2264 and Peter Machinist 2912

Hebrew 350. Hebrew Language and Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 4408
Jay M. Harris 2266 and Jon D. Levenson (Divinity School) 2264

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YIDDISH COURSES

Yiddish A. Elementary Yiddish
Harvard College/GSAS: 4623
Full Year
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 10-11.

Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include rich selections from Jewish humor, Yiddish songs, and films of Jewish life past and present.
Note: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.

Yiddish Ba. Intermediate Yiddish I
Harvard College/GSAS: 6023
Fall 2014
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 11-12.

Further development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Introduction to features of the main Yiddish dialects: Polish/Galician, Ukrainian/Volhynian, and Lithuanian/Belorussian. Course materials include selections from modern Yiddish fiction, poetry, songs, the press, and private letters, as well as pre-WWII and contemporary Yiddish films. Occasional visits from native Yiddish speakers.
Note: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Prerequisite: Yiddish A or equivalent.

Yiddish Bb. Intermediate Yiddish II
Harvard College/GSAS: 1239
Spring 2015
Eitan Lev Kensky and staff
Meeting Time: M., W., F., 11-12.

Continuation of Yiddish BA.
Prerequisite: Yiddish BA or permission of the instructor.

Yiddish 200r. Literature and Belief: The Case of Modern Yiddish Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 4263
Fall 2014
Dara Horn Schulman
Meeting Time: M., 4-6.

Is literature animated by a “moral of the story,” or by “art for art’s sake”? This question was more than theoretical for modern Yiddish writers, who wrote at a crossroads between religious and secular life, under extraordinary circumstances. The course will explore how genre and belief interact in Yiddish stories, novels, poetry and drama over the past two centuries, as we closely examine the broader question of the purpose of art.
Note: Reading knowledge of Yiddish appreciated but not required; all texts available in translation. Open to graduate students in any department, and undergraduates with permission of the instructor. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3719.

Yiddish 300. Yiddish Language and Literature
Harvard College/GSAS: 7833
Instructor to be determeined.


Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010.

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HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

Custom and Legal Authority: Advanced Topics in Jewish Law and Legal Theory
Professor Noah Feldman
Fall 2014 Reading Group
Meeting Time: Tu., 7:00pm - 9:00pm in WCC Room 3011.
1 classroom credit

The group will examine sociological questions of the Yeshiva world as well as theoretical/textual ones regarding what is studied, and how, and by whom.

Prerequisite: This seminar will be by permission of the instructor, who strongly prefers that students have a background in advanced study of Jewish legal material. To apply please send a short statement of interest including background in Jewish legal studies to nfeldman@law.harvard.edu with a copy to swhalen@law.harvard.edu. Deadline for application is Friday, September 12.
Note: The reading group will meet on the following dates: TBD.

Jewish Identity in Contemporary America
Professor Robert Mnookin
Fall 2014 Seminar
Meeting Time: W., 5:00pm - 7:00pm in WCC Room 3012.
2 classroom credits

Today in America what does it mean to be Jewish? Does it require a religious or spiritual commitment? Or some notion of cultural solidarity? In contemporary America is one’s religious or ethnic identity simply a matter of individual choice? Today Jews are broadly accepted to an unprecedented degree in all facets of American life. Intermarriage is commonplace. All of this contrasts with the situation even in the recent past.

Through a set of readings we will explore: (1) Within America, how has the treatment and circumstances of Jews changed over time? (2) In what ways, because of the First Amendment, has the experience of Jews in America always been different than in Europe and other parts of the world? (3) What are the varieties of ways Jewish identity is constructed in contemporary America? (4) What are the choices faced by young people today in terms of religious identity?

Any interested student, irrespective of his or her own religious commitments or ethnic background – is welcome.

In addition to attendance, class participation is a requirement and during the course of the semester each student will be given special responsibility for helping lead the discussion on one topic. The course will require five brief response papers (about two pages each), on the assigned readings and a 10-15 page term paper on a topic approved by the instructor.

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This publication is for informational purposes only.  The listing of a course in this online
directory does not necessarily imply endorsement by the Center for Jewish Studies,
nor does the absence of a course necessarily imply the lack of endorsement.
The goal of this publication is to aid the process of course selection by students interested
in Jewish Studies, and we apologize for inadvertent inclusions and exclusions.

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