Course listings as of August 1, 2016. Course offerings and times may change.
Please check the Website of the Registrar’s Office of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for updated information. https://courses.my.harvard.edu. Thank you!

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GENERAL EDUCATION /INTRODUCTORY CLASSES

CULTBLF 23 From the Hebrew Bible to Judaism, From the Old Testament to Christianity
Class Number: 11389 Course ID: 120880
Spring 2017
Shaye J.D. Cohen
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

The Hebrew Scriptures, what Christians call the “Old Testament” and Jews call the “Bible,” are the basis of both Judaism and Christianity. In this course we shall survey how this work of literature, through interpretation and re-interpretation, spawned two different cultural systems. Topics to be surveyed include: canon and prophecy; exegesis and Midrash; Shabbat and Sunday; temple, synagogue, church; the Oral Torah and the Logos; sin and righteousness; messiah and redemption.
Course Notes: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.
Class Notes: Occasional Fridays are required. Please check course syllabus for details.

CULTBLF 39 The Hebrew Bible
Class Number: 11614 Course ID: 125055
Fall 2016
Shaye J.D. Cohen
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

This course is a survey of the major books and ideas of the Hebrew Bible (commonly called the Old Testament). The course will also treat the historical contexts in which the Bible emerged, and the Bible's role as canonical scripture in Judaism and Christianity. Course Notes: All readings in translation. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.
Class Notes: Occasional Fridays are required. Please check course syllabus for details.

SOCWORLD 35 Conditional Equality: The Case of the Jews of Europe in Modern Times
Class Number: 23409 Course ID: 126640
Spring 2017
Jay Harris
MW 12:00pm-1:00pm

This course is a study in the relations between majorities and minorities in modern Europe, using the Jews as a focus. It will examine the ways in which the equal status of a minority is negotiated through cultural and political interaction, both subtle and blunt. It will further focus on the role that such negotiations have in the formation of identities of both the majority and the minority. Finally, it will examine the ways in which majorities can exercise control over minorities rendering them conditionally rather than fully equal participants in the national projects of the age.
Course Notes: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

HUMAN 10A A Humanities Colloquium: From Homer to Garcia Marquez
Class Number: 12060 Course ID: 110440
Fall 2016
Louis Menand, Stephen Greenblatt, Deidre Lynch, Jill Lepore, Davíd L. Carrasco and Jay Harris
T 10:00am-11:30am

2,500 years of essential works, taught by six professors. Humanities 10a includes works by Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Sophocles, Dante, Shakespeare, Mozart, Austen, Douglass, and Garcia Marquez, as well as the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the Declaration of Independence. One 90-minute lecture plus a 90-minute discussion seminar led by the professors every week. Students also receive instruction in critical writing one hour a week, in writing labs and individual conferences. Students who take both Humanities 10a and 10b fulfill the College Writing Requirement. This is the only course outside of Expository Writing that satisfies that requirement. Students also have opportunities to visit cultural venues and attend musical and theatrical events in Cambridge or Boston.
Course Notes: Humanities 10a will be lotteried by application process, administered at the first meeting. See the course website for more details. Humanities 10b, which meets in the Spring, is open only to students who have completed Humanities 10a and includes works by Joyce, Nietzsche, Rousseau, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Murasaki, Augustine, Virgil, Sophocles, and Homer. Most students take both semesters of Hum 10, but students who do not take 10b receive full credit for 10a. Hum 10a meets the General Education requirement for Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding. Hum 10a and 10b meets the General Education requirements for both Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding and Culture and Belief as well as the Expos requirement. The course is open only to freshmen. No auditors. The course may not be taken Pass/Fail.
Class Notes: The course will be lotteried by application process, administered at the first meeting, on Thursday, September 1. See the course website for more details.

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FRESHMAN SEMINARS

FRSEMR 60Y Great Books of Judaism
Class Number: 24366 Course ID: 203404
Fall 2016
David Stern
W 3:00pm-6:00pm

What makes a foundational religious book? How do the texts of these books develop, and what functions do they serve as material objects—physical books--in religious communities and traditions beyond conveying the texts they contain? This seminar will explore these questions by examining four “canonical” books of Judaism—the Babylonian Talmud; the Bible commentary of Rashi, the most famous Jewish commentator; the Prayerbook; and the Passover Haggadah—as they have developed from the ancient period until today. In the case of each book, the text will be studied historically-- “excavated” for its sources and roots, and its subsequent development over the centuries—and holistically, as a canonical document in Jewish tradition. Class time will be devoted primarily to learning to read the primary sources in translation; supplementary secondary readings will provide historical and cultural context. The seminar will also include regular visits to Houghton Library to look at manuscripts, early printed editions, and facsimiles of these books in order to consider the relationship of materiality to textuality, and to study the changing shapes these books have taken as a key to understanding how they were studied and used. While each book will raise its own set of issues, we will repeatedly deal with three basic questions: What makes a “Jewish” text? How do these texts represent different aspects of Jewish identity? What can these books tell us about the canonical books of other religious traditions?
Course Notes: No previous background in Jewish Studies or knowledge of Hebrew is required.
Course Requirements: Course open to Freshman Students Only

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BIBLICAL / ANCIENT NEAR EAST

ANE 120A Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament 1: Pentateuch and Former Prophets
Class Number: 11035 Course ID: 118849
Fall 2016
Andrew Teeter
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible, considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the first part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the major biblical narrative traditions, the Pentateuch and Former Prophets.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1102.

ANE 120B Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament 2:
Latter Prophets and Writings

Class Number: 11627 Course ID: 126065
Spring 2017
Andrew Teeter
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

A critical introduction to the literature and theology of the Hebrew Bible,
considered in light of the historical contexts of its formation and the interpretive contexts of its reception within Judaism and Christianity. The course, the second part of a divisible, year-long sequence, will focus on the Latter Prophets and the Writings.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1103.

ANE 145 Poetry in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East
Class Number: 24470 Course ID: 203480
Fall 2016
Jonathan Kline
M 1:00pm-3:00pm

About one-third of the Hebrew Bible is poetry. This course will focus on these poetic texts and on the poetry of the neighbors of ancient Israel. Topics include: the distinction between poetry and prose; poetic genres (e.g., myths, epics, prayers, proverbs, laments, prophecies, wisdom, love poems); and literary devices (e.g., parallelism, meter, wordplay). All primary sources will be read in English
translation, though students who can read the texts in the original languages will have opportunities to do so.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1124.

ANE 210 Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible: Seminar
Class Number: 24359 Course ID: 114445
Fall 2016
Richard Saley
M 3:00pm-6:00pm

This course focuses on the art of recovering the text of the Hebrew Bible using Hebrew and Greek manuscripts as well as other early textual witnesses.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1819.
Class Notes: Enrollment limited to 12.
Recommended Prep: At least two years of Hebrew and one year of Greek; some knowledge of Aramaic, Latin, and Syriac is helpful but not required.

COMPLIT 259 The Bible as a Book (Graduate Seminar in General Education)
Class Number: 23886 Course ID: 203275
Fall 2016
David Stern
Th 2:00pm-5:00pm

This interdisciplinary seminar will focus upon the intersection of two distinct subjects-- the Bible, on the one hand, and the history of the book as a material text, on the other-- in order to show how the varying physical features that the Bible has taken in Jewish, Christian, and modern secular culture over the last two millenia have shaped the different meanings that the book has held (and continues to hold) for its readers. The seminar will deal with both the content of the course and ways to communicate and teach that content imaginatively and effectively to students.
Course Notes: The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates. Interested students should contact the instructor before the start of the term.

HEBREW 236 The Song at the Sea: Seminar
Class Number: 23857 Course ID: 120897
Fall 2016
Jon Levenson
Th 4:00pm-6:00pm

A close reading of Exodus 13:17-15:21 and parallel biblical texts in the context of the Hebrew Bible and the ancient Near East.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1816.
Recommended Prep: An introductory course in the critical study of the Hebrew Bible and a solid command of Hebrew grammar (any period).

SEMPHIL 151 Introduction to Northwest Semitic Epigraphy
Class Number: 13016 Course ID: 127648
Fall 2016
Instructor: TBA
Time: TBA

Readings in Hebrew, Phoenician and other Northwest Semitic inscriptions with an introduction to methods and techniques of Northwest Semitic palaeography, and attention to problems of historical grammar.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1152.
Recommended Prep: Good working knowledge of Classical (Biblical) Hebrew.

SEMPHIL 220R Northwest Semitic Epigraphy: Seminar
Class Number: 10400 Course ID: 112083
Spring 2017
Instructor: TBA
Time: TBA

Topic for 2015-16 to be determined.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1160.
Recommended Prep: Semitic Philology 151.

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JEWISH LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND CULTURE

HIST 13H Jewish Identity in the Modern World
Class Number: 23298 Course ID: 203043
Fall 2016
Derek Penslar
Th 2:00pm-4:00pm

This course offers an extended exploration of the construction of modern Jewish selfhood and the relationship between religiosity, secularization, individualism, and collectivism in modern Jewish history. Covering Europe, Asia, and the Americas, we will discuss the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), 19th-century movements to reform and reframe Judaism, acculturation and assimilation, conversion, diaspora nationalism, and Zionism. Our readings will blend memoir and literature with historical scholarship. Requirements include active participation, three response essays, and a research essay.

HIST 1008 The State of Israel in Comparative Perspective
Class Number: 23067 Course ID: 203044
Spring 2017
Derek Penslar
TTh 1:00pm-2:30pm

This course addresses controversies surrounding the history of Zionism and the state of Israel.  Central to these controversies are questions of comparison.  Is Zionism a movement for collective liberation, like national movements of stateless or colonized peoples, or a variety of western colonialism?  Does Israeli statecraft operate within a normal geopolitical spectrum, or is it unusually expansionist and aggressive?    This course seeks to answer such questions through a broad and deep analysis that spans the 19th and 20th centuries, pays close attention to Israel’s social and cultural history as well as high politics and military affairs, and imbeds modern Israel into multiple global contexts.

COMPLIT 179 Ghostwriters and Ventriloquists: Postwar Jewish American Culture
Class Number: 23587 Course ID: 203082
Fall 2016
Saul Zaritt
M 12:00pm-2:00pm

This course takes the idea of the “ghostwriter” and uses it as a lens through which to read postwar Jewish American culture. In the wake of the Holocaust, Jewish American writers and cultural producers began to feel a responsibility to a lost civilization that seemed to haunt their every creative act. Even as Jewish writers in America achieved worldwide fame, they felt both burdened and inspired by old world ghosts. Often the very success of a given work was attributed to the ways in which writers seemingly reanimated or ventriloquized these ghosts in order to
alternately dazzle and comfort their audiences. This course asks: How does “ghosting” compensate for trauma and loss? In what ways does the reenactment performed in ghostwriting also produce a distorted translation of the original? Even when this distortion is acknowledged, why do global audiences, Jewish and non-Jewish, find ghostwriting so appealing? Through analysis of postwar texts and films in English and Yiddish, this course studies how specters of the past function both as arbiters of cultural value and as reminders of the discontinuities and traumas of Jewish American modernity.

EXPOS 20 245 Expository Writing 20
Class Number: 14957 Course ID: 116353
Spring 2017
Jane Rosenzweig
MW 11:00am-12:00pm

An intensive seminar that aims to improve each student’s ability to discover and reason about evidence through the medium of essays. Each section focuses on a particular theme or topic, described on the Expos Website. All sections give students practice in formulating questions, analyzing both primary and secondary sources and properly acknowledging them, supporting arguments with strong and detailed evidence, and shaping clear, lively essays. All sections emphasize revision.
Topic: Jewish Identity in American Culture
Course Notes: Students must pass one term of Expository Writing 20 to meet the College’s Expository Writing requirement.
Class Notes: What does it mean to be Jewish in America in 2016? At a time when a majority of American Jews do not belong to a synagogue and an estimated one-third of married American Jews are married to non-Jews, is there such a thing as a shared identity among American Jews? This course will examine representations of Jews in American culture in an attempt to understand how Jewish-American
culture has evolved since World War II, as well as how shifts in the cultural conversation about minorities in America have affected our conception of Jewish identity. As we consider recent works of literature, art, film, and television, we will question how they challenge and reinforce Jewish stereotypes, and how they
continue to shape our ideas about assimilation, the Holocaust, ethnicity, and
religious practice in America. We will begin by examining stories of assimilation by authors including Grace Paley, Allegra Goodman, Philip Roth, Nathan
Englander, and others. We will then consider representations of the Holocaust, including Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Judy Chicago’s Holocaust Project, and Larry David’s Curb Your Enthusiasm “survivor episode.” In the final unit of the course, students will choose their own sources as they research and develop their ideas about Jewish identity in American culture.

RELIGION 1426 Apocalyptic Literature of the Second Temple Period
Class Number: 23628 Course ID: 109541
Fall 2016
Giovanni Bazzana
MW 10:00am-11:00am

The main focus of this course will be on the apocalyptic literature of the Second Temple and early Christian periods through the close reading in translation of four representative texts (1 Enoch, Daniel, the Apocalypse of John, and 4 Ezra). The course will not be limited to the reading of apocalyptic texts, but it intends to address the main themes that characterize historical research on and the exegesis of this subject, as the definition of the apocalyptic genre, the counter-hegemonic elements in the texts, or the role of violence, which often informs apocalyptic imagery.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1536.

JEWISHST 207 Rewriting Scripture in Jewish Antiquity: Seminar
Class Number: 25130 Course ID: 125365
Fall 2016
Andrew Teeter
T 4:00pm-6:00pm

Class Number: 33799 Course ID: 125365
Spring 2017
Andrew Teeter
T 4:00pm-6:00pm

A study of the phenomenon of scriptural rewriting in the Second Temple period, both within and outside of the received Hebrew Bible. Examination of exegetical techniques, aims, and presuppositions, with attention to higher level compositional strategies, to underlying conceptions of scripture/scriptural authority, and to the dynamics of canon formation. For fall 2016, our study will focus primarily on examples drawn from the Former Prophets and Chronicles.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1302.
Recommended Prep: The course presumes proficiency with Hebrew. Two years of Hebrew (or equivalent) required.
Prerequisite: HDS 1300 "Studies in the Former Prophets"

HEBREW 235 The Binding of Isaac (Aqedah): Seminar
Class Number: 23542 Course ID: 120896
Spring 2017
Jon Levenson
Th 4:00pm-6:00pm

An examination of Genesis 22 and its afterlife in ancient Judaism, early
Christianity, and the Qur’an. Ample consideration of the interpretation and
expansion of the story in modern theology and of critical responses to the story.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1808.
Recommended Prep: Three years of Hebrew or the equivalent, and acquaintance with historical critical methods.

JEWISHST 299 Special Topics in Jewish Studies
Class Number: 16099 Course ID: 161197
Fall 2016
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Time: TBA

Class Number: 16146 Course ID: 161197
Spring 2017
Shaye J.D. Cohen
Time: TBA

Special Topics in Jewish Studies

MOD-HEB 241R Advanced Seminar in Modern Hebrew: Israeli
Culture: Cinema & Literature

Class Number: 11856 Course ID: 127670
Fall 2016
Irit Aharony
TTh 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course constitutes the final level of Modern Hebrew language studies. The course offers representative readings and screenings from contemporary Israeli
literature and cinema, and it forms bases of discussion on major cultural and linguistic themes through academic readings. We will focus on the theme of the family in Israeli culture and relationships between fathers and sons in “Far away Islands”; “Book of Intimate Grammar”; the new series “Shtissel”; and more.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4045. Not open to
auditors. Discussions, papers, movies and texts presented only in Hebrew.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 130b or equivalent.

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RELIGION

RELIGION 1212A Judaism: The Liturgical Year
Class Number: 23632 Course ID: 116591
Fall 2016
Jon Levenson
TTh 11:30am-1:00pm

An introduction to the Jewish tradition through an examination of its liturgical calendar. The ancient Near Eastern affinities and biblical forms of the Jewish
holidays; the observance of the holidays in rabbinic law, their characteristic themes as developed in rabbinic non-legal literature, their special biblical readings, the evolution of the holidays over the centuries, contemporary theological reflection upon them. Emphasis on classic texts, focus on theological and literary issues.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1667a.

RELIGION 1212B Judaism: The Liturgical Year
Class Number: 23363 Course ID: 122954
Spring 2017
Jon Levenson
TTh 11:30am-1:00pm

A continuation of Religion 1212a.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1667b
Course Requirements: Prerequisite: Religion 1212a

JEWISHST 111 Modern Jewish Thought Seminar: Messianic
Eschatology and Apocalyptic Time from Cohen to Levinas

Class Number: 24576 Course ID: 118278
Fall 2016
Elliot Wolfson
T 2:00pm-4:00pm

The seminar will explore the eschatological conception of time developed by the German-Jewish philosophers, Hermann Cohen and Franz Rosenzweig, and the impact of their thinking on the messianic and apocalyptic speculation of Gershom Scholem, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Jacob Taubes, Jacques Derrida, and
Emmanuel Levinas.
Course Notes: Instructor: Elliot Wolfson (UC - Santa Barbara) Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3035.

JEWISHST 151 Introduction to Jewish Mysticism
Class Number: 24579 Course ID: 203489
Fall 2016
Elliot Wolfson
TTh 11:00am-12:00pm

The course will present a survey of the major trends of Jewish mysticism from the merkavah texts of late antiquity to the various schools of kabbalah that evolved in the Middle Ages. Attention will be paid to both the unique and shared aspects of each historical period. Topics to be discussed include: celestial ascent and the angelic transformation of the mystic; letter mysticism and magical techniques;
envisioning the divine and mystical union; gender and the anthropomorphic representation of God; secrecy and mystical fellowship; ascetic eroticism and the spiritual ideal of worship.
Course Notes: Instructor: Elliot Wolfson (UC - Santa Barbara) Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3032.

RELIGION 1529 The Holocaust and the Churches, 1933-45
Class Number: 23070 Course ID: 124910
Spring 2017
Kevin Madigan
W 2:00pm-4:00pm

This seminar will approach the Nazi persecution of European Jewry from several disciplinary perspectives. Initially the seminar will explore the topic historically. In these weeks, the seminar will use a variety of historical materials dealing with the history of European anti-semitism, German history from Bismarck to the
accession of Hitler, the evolution of anti-Jewish persecution in the Third Reich, and the history of the Holocaust itself. Sources to be used will include primary sources produced by the German government 1933-1945, by Jewish victims-to-be or survivors, documentary films, and secondary interpretations. The aims of this part of the seminar will be to understand the basic background to and narrative of the Holocaust, to introduce students to the critical use of primary historical sources, and to familiarize them with some of the major historiographical debates. Then the members of the seminar will ponder religious and theological reactions to the
Holocaust. The seminar will also consider the historical question of the role played by the Protestant and Catholic churches and theologies in the Holocaust. Throughout the seminar, participants will use various literary and cinematographic sources and test their limits in helping to understand and to represent the Holocaust.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 2293. Some background in European history is desirable but not required.

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CLASSICAL AND MODERN HEBREW LANGUAGE COURSES

CLAS-HEB AA Elementary Classical Hebrew
Class Number: 12534 Course ID: 123023
Fall 2016
Jon Levenson
MWF 9:00am-10:00am

A thorough and rigorous introduction to Biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on
grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation mandatory. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010A. Classical
Hebrew AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

CLAS-HEB AB Elementary Classical Hebrew
Class Number: 12300 Course ID: 159881
Spring 2017
Jon Levenson
MWF 9:00am-10:00am

Continuation of Classical Hebrew AA. A thorough and rigorous introduction to Biblical Hebrew, with emphasis on grammar in the first term, and translation of biblical prose in the second. Daily preparation and active class participation
mandatory. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4010B. Classical
Hebrew AA/AB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

CLAS-HEB 120A Intermediate Classical Hebrew I
Class Number: 12986 Course ID: 116431
Fall 2016
Andrew Teeter
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

Readings in prose books; review of grammar.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4020.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew AA/AB sequence or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 120B Intermediate Classical Hebrew II
Class Number: 11993 Course ID: 123873
Spring 2017
Andrew Teeter
MWF 10:00am-11:00am

Readings in prose and poetic books; review of grammar.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4021.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew 120A or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 130AR Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew I
Class Number: 12988 Course ID: 122692
Fall 2016
Jon Levenson
Th 1:00pm-3:00pm

Advanced reading in selected biblical prose texts and intensive review of the
grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1625.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew AA/AB sequence, CH 120A, and 120B, or equivalent.

CLAS-HEB 130BR Rapid Reading Classical Hebrew II
Class Number: 12010 Course ID: 122693
Spring 2017
Jon Levenson
Th 1:00pm-3:00pm

Advanced reading in selected biblical poetic texts and intensive review of the grammar of Biblical Hebrew.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 1626.
Recommended Prep: Classical Hebrew 130A or equivalent.

MOD-HEB BA Elementary Modern Hebrew
Class Number: 12642 Course ID: 114218
Fall 2016
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 10:00am-11:00am

The course introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the
fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4015A. Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. Modern Hebrew BA/BB is an indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

MOD-HEB BB Elementary Modern Hebrew
Class Number: 12407 Course ID: 159988
Spring 2017
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 10:00am-11:00am

The course introduces students to the phonology and script as well as the
fundamentals of morphology and syntax of Modern Hebrew. Emphasis is placed on developing reading, speaking, comprehension and writing skills, while introducing students to various aspects of contemporary Israeli society and culture. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4015B. Not open to auditors. Cannot be taken pass/fail. This is an indivisible course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

MOD-HEB 120A Intermediate Modern Hebrew I
Class Number: 15632 Course ID: 110947
Fall 2016
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 11:00am-12:00pm

The course reinforces and expands knowledge of linguistic and grammatical
structures, with emphasis on further developing the four skills. Readings include selections from contemporary Israeli literature, print media, and internet
publications. Readings and class discussions cover various facets of Israeli high and popular culture. Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4040. Modern Hebrew B or passing of special departmental placement test.
Course Notes: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4040.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew BA/BB sequence or passing of special departmental placement test.

MOD-HEB 120B Intermediate Modern Hebrew II
Class Number: 10721 Course ID: 111756
Spring 2017
Irit Aharony
MTWThF 11:00am-12:00pm

Continuation of Hebrew 120A.
Course Notes: Conducted primarily in Hebrew. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4041.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 120A.

MOD-HEB 130A Advanced Modern Hebrew I
Class Number: 11276 Course ID: 119630
Fall 2016
Irit Aharony
MW 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course constitutes the third year of the Modern Hebrew language sequence. The course emphasizes the development of advanced proficiency in all skills. Readings include texts of linguistic and cultural complexity that cover
contemporary Israeli literature and culture.
Course Notes: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4042.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 120A/120B sequence, or equivalent level of proficiency.

MOD-HEB 130B Advanced Modern Hebrew II
Class Number: 11808 Course ID: 126531
Spring 2017
Irit Aharony
MW 1:00pm-3:00pm

This course is a continuation of Hebrew 130A. Texts, films, and other materials expose students to the richness and complexity of the contemporary
sociolinguistics of Israeli society.
Course Notes: Conducted in Hebrew. Not open to auditors. Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4043.
Recommended Prep: Modern Hebrew 130A, or equivalent level of proficiency.

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YIDDISH COURSES

YIDDISH AA Elementary Yiddish
Class Number: 12523 Course ID: 114058
Fall 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 11:00am–12:00pm

Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and through it, to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include selections from both secular and religious Yiddish
literature; Yiddish jokes, songs, and proverbs; and films of Jewish life past and present. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional
sections at different times may be added as needed. Yiddish AA/AB is an
indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Class Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.

YIDDISH AB Elementary Yiddish
Class Number: 12290 Course ID: 159871
Spring 2017
Yuri Vedenyapin
MWF 11:00am–12:00pm

Continuation of Yiddish AA. Introduction to the Yiddish language, as written and spoken in Eastern Europe, the Americas, Israel, and around the world, and through it, to the culture of Ashkenazic Jews. Development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Course materials include selections from secular and religious Yiddish literature; Yiddish jokes, songs, and proverbs; and films of Jewish life past and present. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.
Course Notes: For students with little or no knowledge of Yiddish. Additional
sections at different times may be added as needed. Yiddish AA/AB is an
indivisible year-long course. Students must complete both terms of this course (parts A and B) within the same academic year in order to receive credit.

YIDDISH BA Intermediate Yiddish I
Class Number: 11392 Course ID: 119874
Fall 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 12:00pm–1:30pm

Further development of reading, writing, speaking, and oral comprehension skills. Introduction to the main Yiddish dialects: Central (“Polish”), Southeastern
(“Ukrainian”), and Northeastern (“Lithuanian/Belorussian”). Course materials include selections from Yiddish fiction, poetry, drama, films, songs, the press, and private correspondence—from the late nineteenth century to the present. Visits by native Yiddish speakers.
Course Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish AA/AB sequence, or equivalent.

YIDDISH BB Intermediate Yiddish II
Class Number: 11365 Course ID: 119875
Spring 2017
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 12:00pm–1:30pm

Continuation of Yiddish BA.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish BA or permission of the instructor.

YIDDISH CA Advanced Yiddish I
Class Number: 11277 Course ID: 123432
Fall 2016
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 2:00pm–3:30pm

Emphasis on building advanced vocabulary with a special focus on the
etymological diversity of Yiddish. Further development of writing, reading,
speaking, and oral comprehension; and continued exploration of Yiddish
dialects. Introduction to various styles of Yiddish literature, journalism, and folklore, including present-day sources from both secular Yiddish culture and the Yiddish-speaking religious communities of New York, Jerusalem, London,
Antwerp, and elsewhere. Ample use of audiovisual materials. Visits by native
Yiddish speakers.
Course Notes: Additional sections at different times may be added as needed.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish BB or permission of the instructor.

YIDDISH CB Advanced Yiddish II
Class Number: 12782 Course ID: 124883
Spring 2017
Yuri Vedenyapin
MW 2:00pm–3:30pm

Continuation of Yiddish CA.
Recommended Prep: Yiddish CA or permission of the instructor.

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HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

Advanced Topics in Jewish Law and Legal Theory
Professor Noah Feldman
Fall 2016 reading group
Th 7:00pm - 9:00pm
1 classroom credit

Professor Noah Feldman
Spring 2017 reading group
T 7:00pm - 9:00pm
1 classroom credit

Prerequisite: This seminar will be by permission of the instructor, who strongly prefers that students have a background in advanced study of Jewish legal material. To apply please send a short statement of interest including background in Jewish legal studies to nfeldman@law.harvard.edu with a copy to swhalen@law.harvard.edu.
Exam Type: No exam.

The group will examine sociological questions of the Yeshiva world as well as theoretical/textual ones regarding what is studied, and how, and by whom.

Note: The reading group will meet on the following dates: TBD.

Subject Areas: International, Comparative & Foreign Law

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ADDITIONAL COURSES RELEVANT TO JEWISH STUDIES

ANE 103 Ancient Lives
Class Number: 15630 Course ID: 110014
Fall 2016
Gojko Barjamovic
TTh 11:30am-1:00pm

What are the essential elements of human society? Have our fundamental
conditions developed, and how? Can we use themes from ancient history to think about contemporary society and culture? These questions are in focus in this course on ‘Ancient Lives’, which explores the earliest human civilizations in the region commonly known as Mesopotamia (c. 3000-300 BCE) in what is now Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey. Few elements in the way we live and organize ourselves today are to be taken for granted. There is, and has always been, a wealth of ways in which humans live. But biologically we are the same as our ancestors of 5000 years ago, at the dawn of history. Any likeness or difference between ‘us and them’ is therefore likely to be a product of history and culture. ‘Ancient Lives’ builds upon this realization to inspire a critical way of thinking about society in the broadest possible scope. Areas explored during the course are selected for their relevance across the range of contemporary life - they include freedom, music, public health, food, jurisprudence, trade, the visual arts, science, sexuality, religion and political power. You learn about how societies and individuals have dealt with change on multiple levels, from large-scale societal revolutions to personal transformation. Having taken this course, you will have gained a fundamental understanding and appreciation of human life in the broadest scope, as well as of your own life as a part of history. You will be able to critically assess contemporary discourses on the study of ‘the other’ in past and present; engage with core concepts of human society, such as justice, beauty, value and belief on a broad historical base; be
familiar with examples of classical social theory and thinkers through concrete cases in which their work has been applied to or shaped by the study of the past; and acquire skills in presenting scholarly work to a general audience.
Course Notes: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General
Education requirement for Societies of the World. This course fulfills the
requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage
substantially with Study of the Past.

GOV 94OF Law and Politics in Multicultural Democracies
Class Number: 11909 Course ID: 128009
Fall 2016
Ofrit Liviatan
T 2:00pm-4:00pm

Examines the role of law in the governance of cultural diversity drawing on examples from the USA, Western Europe, India and Israel. Central themes at the intersection of law and politics will be explored, including: the impact of courts on rights protections, law’s function as a venue of conflict resolution, and courts’
relationship with other political institutions. Specific attention will be given to
contemporary controversies such as Islamic veiling, abortion and same sex marriage.
Class Notes: Undergraduate seminar. Enrollment by lottery. Please see Gov Dept undergraduate website for details.

ROM-STD 148 Love, Knowledge and Debate in the Middle Ages:
The Roman de la rose and Libro de buen amor

Class Number: 23934 Course ID: 203311
Fall 2016
Virginie Greene and Luis Giron Negron
MW 3:00pm-4:30pm

The Old French Roman de la rose and the Old Spanish Libro de buen amor are two treasure troves of medieval stories, poems, fables, treatises, lores, and recipes on love. Whether they consider love as a disease, a social game, a science, a civilizing art or a destructive mania, these books use love to provoke contradictory debates and question fundamental aspects of culture and society. We will focus on these two influential books, plus a few other related texts (e.g. treatises on medicine, love poems, short stories, religious literature) helping us to understand the diverse traditions they hail from, transform, and at times transgress. This course will also constitute an introduction to the medieval world, across languages and cultures. We will be particularly attentive to the contacts and exchanges between Western Europe, the Mediterranean area, and the Near and Middle East, as well as between Muslims, Christians and Jews.
Course Notes: Course taught in English. Texts in English translation (but also available in the original languages for students who can work with any of the
languages involved)

MEDVLSTD 250 At Cross Purposes: The Crusades in Material
Culture

Class Number: 23577 Course ID: 109230
Spring 2017
Evridiki Georganteli
T 10:00am-1:00pm

Crusading expeditions in the Holy Land, Spain and Eastern Europe from 1096 until the end of the Middle Ages shaped the political, socio-economic and cultural map of Europe and the Middle East. This course explores the multifaceted encounters between crusaders, Byzantines, Jews, Armenians and Muslims through the material traces they left behind: architecture, Byzantine objects dispersed across Western Europe, coins, sculptures, frescoes, and manuscripts from the East and the West.

RELIGION 1519 American Religious History Since 1865
Class Number: 23362 Course ID: 156230
Spring 2017
Catherine Brekus
TTh 10:00am-11:30am

This course is a survey of American religion from Reconstruction to the present. We will ask several related questions. How did religious communities shape social and political movements like women’s suffrage, the anti-lynching campaign, the Civil Rights Movement, and second-wave feminism? How did religious
communities respond to developments like urbanization, segregation,
industrialization, the Great Depression, and the creation of new media? How did ordinary people practice their faith? We will discuss a wide variety of religious communities and movements, including the Social Gospel, Catholicism,
Fundamentalism, Judaism, Pentecostalism, New Thought, and the Christian Right. We will also discuss the transformation of the American religious landscape after the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act. In addition to reading major scholarly accounts, we will consult a wide variety of primary sources, including memoirs, sermons, religious periodicals, speeches, and music.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 2376.

RELIGION 1434 History of Western Christianity, 150-1100
Class Number: 23262 Course ID: 117053
Fall 2016
Kevin Madigan
MW 4:00pm-5:30pm

This course is designed to provide a historical overview of the Church and society in western Europe from the second through the twelfth century. Thus, this course will investigate late-antique and early medieval Christianity in its social and its cultural context. Narrative and theological story lines to be pursued will include the varieties of early Christianity; relations with the Roman state (including
persecution of Christians by it); the emergence of normative or “early Catholic” Christianity; early and early medieval monasticism; the search for the Christian doctrine of God and Christ; early Christian architecture, piety and worship;
Christianity and other world religions (especially Judaism and Islam); western and eastern Christianity; the emergence of the Roman primacy; the Christianization of the north of Europe; the nature of parochial Christianity; the emergence of the pope, in the eleventh century, as an international religious force; the crusades; and early medieval piety. We will also be strengthening our skills as interpreters of primary sources. Some attention will be paid to major historiographical issues.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 2230.

RELIGION 1437 History of Western Christianity, 1100-1500
Class Number: 23032 Course ID: 116586
Spring 2017
Kevin Madigan
MW 4:00pm-5:30pm

This course is designed to provide a historical overview of the Church and society in western Europe from the eleventh through the fifteenth centuries. Thus, this course will investigate high and late medieval Christianity in its social and its cultural context. Narrative and theological story lines to be pursued will include medieval monasticism and other new forms of religious life; heresy and its repression; scholasticism, the university and Gothic architecture; the bid for papal monarchy; means of Christianization; saints, relics, pilgrimage and other forms of popular devotion; the decline of the late-medieval papacy and conciliarism; late-medieval heresy; Christianity and other world religions (especially Judaism and Islam); and late-medieval attempts at reform. We will also be strengthening our skills as interpreters of primary sources. Some attention will be paid to major historiographical issues. No prerequisites.
Course Notes: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 2250.

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This publication is for informational purposes only.  The listing of a course in this online
directory does not necessarily imply endorsement by the Center for Jewish Studies,
nor does the absence of a course necessarily imply the lack of endorsement.
The goal of this publication is to aid the process of course selection by students interested
in Jewish Studies, and we apologize for inadvertent inclusions and exclusions.

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