HARVARD.EDU
  |  GSAS   |  COLLEGE   |  DIRECTORY
overview people courses labs graduate undergraduate events
More Information
Summer Courses in Anthropology
Registrar
my.harvard.edu
Course Shopping Tool
Course Catalog
Graduate Programs in Anthropology
Undergraduate Programs in Anthropology






Anthropology Spring 2015 Course Listings

Archaeology
Courses Primarily for Undergraduates
Courses for Undergraduates and Graduates
Courses Primarily for Graduates
Archaeology Cross-listed Courses
Social Anthropology
Courses Primarily for Undergraduates
Courses for Undergraduates and Graduates
Courses Primarily for Graduates
Social Anthropology Cross-listed Courses

Archaeology

Archaeology Courses Primarily for Undergraduates

*Anthropology 97x. Sophomore Tutorial in Archaeology
Catalog Number: 0400                                                                                           Mondays, 3-5
Jason A. Ur and Matthew Joseph Liebmann

Half course (spring term). M., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 17
This course will focus on archaeological thinking, the cognitive skeleton of the discipline of archaeology, the principles and the logic that are the foundation of all archaeological conclusions and research. Central to this is an understanding of research design, archaeological theory and interpretation, culture and material culture; as well as an understanding of how to examine and construct an archaeological argument.
Note: Required of all concentrators in Archaeology.

*Anthropology 91xr. Supervised Reading and Research in Archaeology

Catalog Number: 5660                                                                                                 Individual
Richard H. Meadow
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 14
Special study of selected topics in archaeology, given on an individual basis and directly supervised by a member of the department. May be taken for a letter grade or pass/fail. To enroll, a student must submit a petition form (available from the Head Tutor for Archaeology or downloadable from the department’s Anthropology[Archaeology] website), signed by the adviser with whom he or she wishes to study, and a proposed plan of study.

*Anthropology 92xr. Archaeological Research Methods in Museum Collections

Catalog Number: 9029                                                                                                 Individual
Richard H. Meadow
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 16
Special (individual) study of Peabody Museum (PM) collections approved by the PM Director and directly supervised by a member of the PM curatorial staff. Requires a project involving a museum collection developed in consultation with the supervisor.
Note: Must be taken for a letter grade. Priority given to students in Anthropology and related departments. To enroll, submit a petition form (available on the Anthropology [Archaeology] website), signed by the supervisor, the PM Director, and the Head Tutor for Archaeology and including a proposed research agenda, preferably during the term preceding the term of enrollment. See the Head Tutor for Archaeology or members of the Peabody Museum curatorial staff for more information.

*Anthropology 98xb. Junior Tutorial in Archaeology

Catalog Number: 3568                                                                                                 Individual
Richard H. Meadow
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This individual tutorial for archaeology students intending to write a senior thesis is normally undertaken with a member of the faculty during the second term of junior year. To enroll, a student must submit a petition form (available from the Head Tutor for Archaeology, or downloadable from the department’s Anthropology [Archaeology] website) with a proposed course plan of study and the tutorial adviser’s signature.
Note: Required of candidates for honors in Archaeology.

*Anthropology 99x. Thesis Tutorial in Archaeology - Senior Year

Catalog Number: 6656
Richard H. Meadow
Full course. Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 13
Research and writing of the Senior Thesis. Limited to honors candidates. Signature of the faculty adviser on a departmental form is required. Download form here.


Archaeology Courses for Undergraduates and Graduate Students

Anthropology 1060. Archaeological Science
Catalog Number: 2013                                                                     Mondays, 7-10 pm (M.I.T.)
Richard H. Meadow
Half course (spring term). M., 7-10 pm. EXAM GROUP: 13
Focus on physical science and engineering methods and techniques used by archaeologists in the reconstruction of time, space, and human paleoecology, and analysis of archaeological materials. Topics include 14C dating, ice core and palynological analysis, stable isotope chemistry of paleodietary foodwebs, soil micromorphology and site formation, Pb isotope sourcing of metal artifacts, and microstructural and mechanical analyses of cementitious materials used in ancient monumental buildings.
Note: Meets at MIT.
Prerequisite: One year of college-level chemistry or physics.

Anthropology 1062 (formerly Anthropology 2062). Religions of Latin America: Mexico, Peru, El Caribe


Catalog Number: 60945                                                                                         Wednesdays, 1-3
Davíd L. Carrasco (Divinity School and Faculty of Arts and Sciences) 

Half course (spring term). W., 1-3

This semester’s course will focus on Mexico and the Mexican Americas from 1517-2017 while making comparisons with both Peru and religions of the Caribbean. While Mexican based religions will thread through the entire course, students can choose to also work on religious practices, sacred sites and migration stories from either Peru or El Caribe in comparative perspective. Examines symbols, root paradigms, saints, health practices, miracles and migration by integrating archaeological, artistic, documentary, novels and ethnographic source materials. Methods from anthropology, history of religions, religion and literature will be used to study race mixture, architecture, women’s roles, transculturation, liberation theology, and plastic arts.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3705.

Anthropology 1131. Archaeology of Harvard Yard II: Laboratory Methods and Analysis
Catalog Number: 0655                                                                                         Thursdays, 1-4
Patricia Capone and Diana Loren
Half course (spring term). Th., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 1
Open to students who participated in the fall term investigations in Harvard Yard, this course focuses on the detailed analysis of the materials recovered in the excavations, within the context of archival and comparative archaeological and historical research. The analysis will also include an evaluation of the results of the ground-penetrating radar surveys conducted prior to the excavations, as part of the research design for the next season of investigations of the Indian College site.
Prerequisite: Anthropology 1130, Archaeology of Harvard Yard.

Anthropology 1155. The Archaeology of Cities in Ancien Mesopotamia
Catalog Number: 8450                                                                                     Mon. & Wed. 2-3
Jason A. Ur
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 2 EXAM GROUP: 5
The world’s first cities emerged in Mesopotamia and were the defining characteristic of ancient civilizations in what is today Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. They were inhabited by large populations, powerful kings, and the gods themselves. The course will consider the origins, ecology, spatial arrangement, socioeconomic religious organization, religious institutions, and collapse of cities from Gilgamesh to Saddam. Through archaeology and ancient texts, students will become familiar with cities such as Uruk, Babylon, Nineveh, and Baghdad. The course will include visits to collections of the Peabody Museum and the Harvard Semitic Museum.

Anthropology 1168. Maya Glyphs
Catalog Number: 71052                                                                                  Tue. & Thu. 10-11
Alexandre Andreevich Tokovinine
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 12
Learn to read and write in Maya glyphs to discover the most spectacular civilization in the Americas in its own words! This course covers the basics of Maya writing and art using the outstanding visual and material collections of the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions and Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. It explores the indigenous Maya myths, histories, and stories of life at the ancient courts of lords and nobles.

Anthropology 1202. Forensic Anthropology: CSI Harvard
Catalog Number: 70564                                                                                    Tue. & Thu. 12-1
Jessica Ines Cerezo-Román
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12. EXAM GROUP: 9
This course will explore the developing role of the archaeologist and anthropologist in forensic investigations (both ancient and modern). It will follow the process undertaken by forensic specialists during their investigation and look at their role in a number of contexts ranging from missing persons to crimes against humanity. It will consider the ethical responsibilities of the archaeologist/anthropologist and the presentation of their findings.

Anthropology 1400. Quests for Wisdom: Religious, Moral and Aesthetic Experiences in the Art of Living
Catalog Number: 53142 Enrollment: Limited to undergraduates.              Tue. & Thu. 10-11:30
Arthur Kleinman, Davíd L. Carrasco (Divinity School and Faculty of Arts and Sciences), and Michael J. Puett
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
New interdisciplinary curriculum centered on 5 kinds of quests for wisdom that involve moral, religious and aesthetic pursuits and that focus on practices of mentoring and caregiving. Students will engage in short lectures, interactive discussions, student led seminars, and music and film. Students’ required projects include a personal story that narrates an experience in the art of living and writing assignments that focus on assisting and accompanying experiences of others.
Note: Limited to undergraduates.

Archaeology Courses Primarily for Graduate Students

Anthropology 2010br. Materials in Ancient Societies: Ceramics
Catalog Number: 1753                                                                  TBA (at CMRAE Lab , M.I.T.)
C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This seminar-laboratory subject provides in-depth study of the technologies of ancient societies.
Note: Anthropology 2010ar is commonly taken before Anthropology 2010br.

Anthropology 2038. Bioarchaeology - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 93911                                                                                         Tuesdays, 1-3
Jessica Ines Cerezo-Román
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 1
In the broadest of terms, bioarchaeology as used in the United State is the study of human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. This includes a myriad of interconnected phenomena including mortuary contexts, paleodemography, paleopathology, and assessing human variation and adaptation. It also encompasses scientific approaches and applications of social theory, and carries weighted concerns for historical context and ethical issues. Since its inception in the 1970’s bioarchaeology has evolved into a mature and diversified approach to understanding human biology and behavior in the past. This course will provide an overview of contemporary bioarchaeological research. Students will develop a historical perspective on bioarchaeology within the larger context of American anthropology. Emphases also are

Anthropology 2111. Changes in the Land: The Archaeology of Humans and the Earth (Graduate Seminar in General Education) - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 50321                                                                                       Thursdays, 2-5
Christian Alexander Tryon and Jeffrey Quilter
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–5. EXAM GROUP: 11
How have humans shaped the environment and how has the environment shaped humans throughout their (pre)history? We will explore key theories and case studies and students will further explore these questions through independent research.
Note: The seminar will design and develop a General Education course on these themes for undergraduates.

Anthropology 2155. The Archaeology of Cities of Ancient Mesopotamia - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 32369                                                                                        Mondays and Wednesdays, 2
Jason A. Ur
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
The world’s first cities emerged in Mesopotamia and were the defining characteristic of ancient civilizations in what is today Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. They were inhabited by large populations, powerful kings, and the gods themselves. The course will consider the origins, ecology, spatial arrangement, socioeconomic religious organization, religious institutions, and collapse of cities from Gilgamesh to Saddam. Through archaeology and ancient texts, students will become familiar with cities such as Uruk, Babylon, Nineveh, and Baghdad. The course will include visits to collections of the Peabody Museum and the Harvard Semitic Museum.
Note: Students must attend all meetings of Anthropology 1155 and a weekly section.

Anthropology 2210. Archaeology and the Ancient Economy

Catalog Number: 3586                                                                                            Mondays 1-4
C. C. Lamberg-Karlovsky and Rowan K. Flad
Half course (spring term). M., 1–4. EXAM GROUP: 8
Numerous theories are advanced for the structure of the ancient economy. Different perspectives on the nature of trade, the market, reciprocity-redistribution, etc. will be reviewed. An evolutionary and global perspective will be pursued from the Neolithic to the Iron Age.
Note: Open to undergraduates.


Archaeology Cross-listed Courses

Ancient Near East 113. Environmental Archaeology of the Ancient Near East - (New Course)
Catalog Number: 91925                                                                                          Tuesdays 1-3
Robert Homsher
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3 with occasional labs to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 1
This course deals with major changes in climate and environment affecting humans, and the various ways in which Near Eastern societies have endured, mastered, or destroyed themselves, from an ecological perspective. Importance is placed on a diachronic outlook on dynamic human-environment interactions as understood through archaeology, particularly with reference to the challenge of sustainability in the so-called Anthropocene. A major focus of this course will be on case studies from around the eastern Mediterranean and greater Near East during the Holocene, but particularly dealing with examples from the Levant (modern Israel/Palestine, Syria, southern Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan). Topics will cover different types of environments and geological processes found in the Near East, practical sampling and analytical procedures, and major categories of anthropological interpretation.
Note: Ancient Near East 115 and/or Anthropology 1010 are helpful, but certainly not essential, as background.

Egyptian Ab. The Language of the Pharaohs: Introduction to Egyptian hieroglyphs II

Catalog Number: 80515                                                                              Mon. & Wed. 1:30-3
Peter Der Manuelian
Half course (spring term). M., W., 1:30–3. EXAM GROUP: 8
Continues Middle Egyptian I from the spring 2013 semester. Students will complete the introductory grammar book lessons, and move on to read a selection of basic stories, historical and biographical inscriptions, in the original hieroglyphs. Visits to the Egyptian galleries of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in order to read some of the ancient hieroglyphic inscriptions on the original monuments, may also be included.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 4121.
Prerequisite: Egyptian Aa, Middle Egyptian I or consent of instructor.

Culture and Belief 21. Pathways through the Andes–Culture, History, and Beliefs in Andean South America

Catalog Number: 2073                                                                                  Tue. & Thu. 1-2:30
Thomas B. F. Cummins (History of Art and Architecture)
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 1:00–2:30, and weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 1
This course explores the arts and cultures of Andean South America from the Pre-Columbian through Colonial periods. Emphasis is on the place of objects–textiles, ceramics, sculptures, and books–in the construction of meanings, identities and values as these changed over time. Readings are drawn from archaeology, ethnohistory, ethnology, art history and original sources. Students will work with Pre-Columbian and Colonial Andean artifacts in the collections of the Peabody Museum.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Culture and Belief or Societies of the World, but not both. This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.

Societies of the World 38. Pyramid Schemes: The Archaeological History of Ancient Egypt

Catalog Number: 36776                                                                                  Mon. Wed., 11-12
Peter Der Manuelian (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; Anthropology)
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 14
Surveys ancient Egyptian pharaonic civilization. Emphasizes Egyptian material culture: pyramids, temples, tombs, settlements, and artifacts. Explores major developmental themes that defined the Egyptian state: the geographical landscape, kingship, social stratification, and religion. Follows a chronological path with excursions into Egyptian art, history, politics, religion, literature, and language (hieroglyphs). Also touches on contemporary issues of object repatriation, archaeology and cultural nationalism, and the evolution of modern Egyptology. Includes field trips to the Egyptian collections of the Peabody Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, along with immersive 3D computer models in Harvard’s Visualization Center. No prior experience in Egyptology expected.
Note: This course fulfills the requirement that one of the eight General Education courses also engage substantially with Study of the Past.




Social Anthropology



Social Anthropology Courses Primarily for Undergraduates

Anthropology 97z. Sophomore Tutorial in Social Anthropology
Catalog Number: 5832                                                                                   Tuesdays 11:30-1
Asad A. Ahmed
Half course (spring term). Tu., 11:30–1. EXAM GROUP: 15
The course is designed as a foundational course with the specific purpose of introducing the principal social theorists whose work has been crucial to the discipline of social anthropology, that is: Marx, Durkheim, Weber, and Foucault. The first objective is to delineate the broad outlines of their thought and the central questions that informed their intellectual and political interventions. The second objective is to provide a solid grounding in the key concepts as well as the theoretical and methodological contributions of these social theorists. Finally, we will seek to demonstrate how contemporary anthropological theory continues to engage with their work.
Note: Required of all concentrators. Weekly 2-hour sections to be arranged.

Anthropology 91zr. Supervised Reading and Research and Research in Social Anthropology

Catalog Number: 3619                                                                                                Individual
Ramyar Dagoberto Rossoukh (spring term)
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 2
Special study of selected topics in Anthropology, given on an individual basis and directly supervised by a member of the Department. May be taken for a letter grade or Pass/Fail. To enroll, a student must submit to the Anthropology Undergraduate Office, Tozzer 103B, a course form signed by the adviser under whom s/he wishes to study and a proposed plan of study. Anthro 91zr form available from the Undergrad Office, or the department website.

Anthropology 92zr. Social Anthropology Research Methods in Museum Collections
Catalog Number: 4742                                                                                                Individual
Ramyar Dagoberto Rossoukh (spring term)
Special (individual) study of Peabody Museum collections directly supervised by a faculty member and a member of the curatorial staff. Requires a project involving a Harvard Museum collection, developed in consultation with the supervisors.
Note: Must be taken for a letter grade. Priority given to students in Anthropology and related departments. To enroll, submit a petition form (available from the Undergraduate Office, Tozzer 103B), signed by both supervisors, a proposed research agenda, during the term preceding the term of enrollment. Information sheets with Museum contacts available in Tozzer 103B.

Anthropology 98zb. Junior Tutorial for thesis writers in Social Anthropology

Catalog Number: 35711                                                                                             Individual
Ramyar Dagoberto Rossoukh
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged.
This individual tutorial is for social anthropology students intending to write a senior thesis, and is normally undertaken with an advanced graduate student during the second term of junior year. Students will have weekly meetings with the project advisor for the purposes of developing the appropriate background research on theoretical, thematic, regional, and methodological literature relevant to their thesis topic, and fully refining their summer research proposal. The tutorial’s final paper will be comprised of a research proposal representing the research undertaken during the semester.
Note: Strongly recommended for any social anthropology junior intending to write a senior thesis. Taken in addition to the required fall term group junior tutorial, Anthropology 98za (formerly 98z).

Anthropology 99z. Thesis Tutorial in Social Anthropology - Senior Year

Catalog Number: 0787                                                                                            Individual
Richard H. Meadow (fall term) and Ramyar Dagoberto Rossoukh (spring term)
Full course. Hours to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: Fall: 8
This is a full year research and writing seminar limited to senior honors candidates. The course is intended to provide students with practical guidance and advice during the thesis writing process through structured assignments and peer feedback on work-in-progress. It is intended to supplement not replace faculty thesis advising (with the requirement of consulting regularly with the advisor built into the assignments) and, most importantly, allow students to share their work and experiences with other thesis writers in a collegial and supportive environment. The seminar will be run jointly by the Department of Anthropology Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Writing Tutor.

Social Anthropology Courses for Undergraduates and Graduates

Anthropology 1400. Quests for Wisdom: Religious, Moral and Aesthetic Experiences in the Art of Living
Catalog Number: 53142                                                                         Tues & Thu. 10-11:30
Enrollment: Limited to undergraduates.
Arthur Kleinman, Davíd L. Carrasco (Divinity School and Faculty of Arts and Sciences), and Michael J. Puett
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
New interdisciplinary curriculum centered on 5 kinds of quests for wisdom that involve moral, religious and aesthetic pursuits and that focus on practices of mentoring and caregiving. Students will engage in short lectures, interactive discussions, student led seminars, and music and film. Students’ required projects include a personal story that narrates an experience in the art of living and writing assignments that focus on assisting and accompanying experiences of others.
Note: Limited to undergraduates.

Anthropology 1600. Grounding the Global: Anthropological Approaches
Catalog Number: 8296                                                                                   Mon. & Wed. 2-3
Steven C. Caton (spring term)
Half course (fall term; repeated spring term). Spring: M., W., at 2. EXAM GROUP: Spring: 18
What is the value of anthropology for understanding today’s world? This course illustrates the importance of an anthropological perspective for engaging with a wide range of pressing global issues such as border regimes, climate change, human rights, and health epidemics. Over the semester, students will grapple with what it means to "ground the global" through an emphasis on everyday experience, cultural particularity, subject formation, and collective action.
Note: Freshmen welcome. This course is now specifically required of all Social Anthropology students, beginning with those who entered the concentration in 2013-14.

Anthropology 1650 (formerly Anthropology 159). Thinking with Collections

Catalog Number: 4185  Enrollment: Limited to 15.                                               Tuesdays 3-5
David R. Odo
Half course (spring term). Tu., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 16
Anthropologists have to varying degrees been interested in the social nature of works of art and other material objects since the founding of the discipline, but especially in objects created outside of western societies, the traditional domain of art historians. In art history, recent years have witnessed a shift toward a more global scope of research and away from Eurocentric definitions of what constitutes art, even as anthropological interest in all forms of art and art making continues to expand. This seminar will examine broad issues in material anthropology using objects from across multiple Harvard collections, including the Harvard Art Museums, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Houghton Library, the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, and other collecting entities. Ample consideration will be given to the making of objects, in a variety of artistic, cultural, and historical contexts. Theoretically and historically informed object-based investigations will enable seminar participants to discover new ways of using Harvard collections as an intellectual resource, critically examine exhibitionary strategies, and gain an understanding of complex collecting practices and politics, all within a comparative, cross-institution framework. Students will produce original work based on primary research conducting in Harvard collections.

Anthropology 1682. Gangsters and Troublesome Populations

Catalog Number: 34637                                                                                      Mondays 12-2
Laurence A. Ralph
Half course (spring term). M., 12-2. EXAM GROUP: 8
The term "gang" has been used to describe all kinds of collectives, from well-dressed mobsters to petty criminals to juvenile delinquents. About the only thing that has remained consistent about gangs is their characterization as the internal Other. This class will investigate how the category of "the gang" serves to provoke discourses of "dangerous" subjects in urban enclaves. More broadly, we will examine the methods and means by which liberal democratic governments maintain their sovereign integrity through the containment of threatening populations.

Anthropology 1727. Sensory Korea - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 44967                                                                                        Tuesdays 1-3
Nicholas H. Harkness
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 1
Spicy stews and softer soju, warm hearts and clean voices, fire illness and refreshing prayer: these are various sites through which Korean social life materializes. This course introduces contemporary South (and North) Korea through the cultural semiotics of the senses. Lectures and discussion will explore social class and mobility through the tastes and smells of food and drink; gender and religion through bodily experiences of illness and healing; politics and kinship through mass spectacle and feelings of human contact; and urban modernity through sound. Course materials combine history and ethnography, social and semiotic theory, and multimedia documentation.
Prerequisite: None. Korean language is helpful but not necessary.

Anthropology 1742. Housing and Heritage: Conflicts over Urban Space

Catalog Number: 61658                                                                               Mon. & Wed. 9-10
Michael Herzfeld
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 9. EXAM GROUP: 10
The celebration of national and local forms of heritage often rides roughshod over the interests of the local citizenry it is intended to serve. In this course we look at how such conflicts play out in several cities - notably Athens, Bangkok, Beijing, Istanbul, Jerusalem and Rome - and address the ethical, practical, and architectural conflicts that arise from an anthropological perspective.

Anthropology 1745. Planners, Experts, and Bureaucrats: Seminar - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 29962                                                                                      Thursdays 3-5
Federico Perez
Half course (spring term). Th., 3–5. EXAM GROUP: 16
How is state authority and control achieved? What kinds of knowledge, objects, spaces, and practices do state bureaucracies mobilize? In this course we will read recent ethnographic and historical works on state planning, expertise, and bureaucracy. The course aims to build a nuanced account of the workings of state bureaucracies and the everyday processes through which they exercise power. We will examine the wide array of agents, artifacts, and practices that are at the core of state action. Topics include bureaucratic materiality, documentary practices, planning technologies, development, environmental policies, and architecture and design, among others.

Anthropology 1795. The Politics of Language and Identity in Latin America

Catalog Number: 7265                                                                                          Mondays 2-4
Catalina Laserna
Half course (spring term). M., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 18
Introduces theory and research in linguistic anthropology in the context of ethnographic research, film and popular music, from cumbia to hip-hop in Latin America. Examines how the multiplicity and contention of language ideologies play out in the everyday practices. What are the social, linguistic and discursive means by which social identity is constructed? How do ways of speaking, such as border talk and code switching, link face to face communities to the national and transnational spheres? Texts include regional ethnographies, music and documentaries from the region as well as the literature in the burgeoning new field of linguistic anthropology.
Note: This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Culture and Belief.

Anthropology 1812. Cities of the Global South: Seminar - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 74114                                                                                 Wednesdays 12-2
Federico Perez
Half course (spring term). W., 12-2 with film screenings to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 18
What do the sprawling cities of the global South tell us about the contemporary urban condition? How is urban space produced and experienced in an era of increased interconnectedness, but also of great inequality and instability? How does the view from the South change our understanding of urban forms and processes, especially when so much of the “South” seems to be located in the “North”? To address these questions we will explore urban lives and spaces across cities in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The course will include works in anthropology, geography, urban studies, and documentary film.

*Anthropology 1836ar (formerly *Anthropology 1836aar). Sensory Ethnography I:: Studio course

Catalog Number: 7583 Enrollment: Limited to 10.                        Mon. & Wed., 2-4; Tue 6-8
Lucien G. Castaing-Taylor
Half course (spring term). M., W., 2–4, Tu., 6–8 p.m. EXAM GROUP: 18
First half of a year-long sequence in which students apply media anthropological theory and conduct ethnography using film, video, sound, and/or still photography.
Note: Students must also attend all VES 158ar classes. Emphasis is on pre-production and production in the spring, and on post-production in the fall. Interview with instructor and teaching assistant required for admission.

Anthropology 1850. Ethnography as Practice and Genre

Catalog Number: 1686                                                                        Tue. & Thurs. 10-11:30
Mary M. Steedly
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 10–11:30. EXAM GROUP: 12
For sociocultural anthropologists, ethnography is both a way of studying human communities and a way of writing about them. Ethnographic fieldwork raises issues of participation, power, and perspective; cultural relativism; the nature of evidence; and the ethics of engagement. Writing ethnography highlights other issues, such as the politics of representing “others.” This course explores these and related issues through close reading and intensive discussion of selected texts.

Anthropology 1996. Angels, Ghosts, and Hustlers: Bangkok Live

Catalog Number: 97643                                                                             Mon. & Wed. 11-12
Michael Herzfeld
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 11. EXAM GROUP: 14
This ethnographic exploration of a huge Asian metropolis emphasizes the changing role of markets and temples; the impact of tourism and new transportation systems; religious doctrine and popular worship; and urban political dynamics.



Social Anthropology Courses Primarily for Graduate Students

Anthropology 2628. Ethnographic Methods for Anthropological Research
Catalog Number: 32957                                                                                      Tuesdays 12-3
Byron J. Good (Medical School) and Alasdair Simon Donald (Medical School)
Half course (spring term). Tu., 12–3. EXAM GROUP: 9
This course will review methods used by contemporary anthropologists conducting ethnographic research. Special focus of the course will be on ethnographic interviewing. Will also consider such topics as use of visual material, mixed methods linking qualitative, quantitative and ethnographic material, and approaches to data analysis. Course will include observational and interviewing exercises.

*Anthropology 2635. Image/Media/Publics: Seminar

Catalog Number: 9515 Enrollment: Limited to 15.                                                Tuesdays 1-3
Mary M. Steedly
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 1
Explores the relations among technologies of image production and circulation, the nature and intensity of the circulating image, and the generation of publics and counter-publics. Questions of scale, mediation, publicity, and mobilization will be considered.
Note: Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor.

*Anthropology 2650b. History and Theory of Social Anthropology: Proseminar

Catalog Number: 7971                                                                                      Thursdays 10-1
Ajantha Subramanian
Half course (spring term). Th., 10–1. EXAM GROUP: 12
Continuation of Anthropology 2650a.
Note: Required of candidates for the PhD in Social Anthropology. Not open to undergraduates.

Anthropology 2662. Anthropology of Consumer Cultures - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 63723                                                                               Wednesdays 10-12
Christine Yano
Half course (spring term). W., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 5
In the twenty-first century, consumer cultures tie local and global worlds together in complex, shifting, and interactive ways. This course explores issues of class, gender/sexuality, modernity, identity, nation, globalism, and desire, asking:- what are the mutual influences of culture and the marketplace?- what are the conditions and practices of consumption that shape meaning in contemporary life? - how has a marketplace template shaped mental mappings of our social worlds? In the contemporary world, to buy is to become, as well as to engage in practices and politics of modernity. This course explores the dynamics of consumption embedded within our lives.

Anthropology 2675. Religion, Nation, and Government in Modern South Asia

Catalog Number: 2639                                                                                      Thursdays 12-2
Asad A. Ahmed
Half course (spring term). Th., 12-2. EXAM GROUP: 6
This course attempts to understand the recent successes of religio-political movements in South Asia. This involves both a theoretical interrogation and genealogy of religion, nationalism, and secularism as well as attention to their historical elaboration.
Note: Open to undergraduate students with permission of instructor.

Anthropology 2688. The Frankfurt School, Film, and Popular Culture

Catalog Number: 1182 Enrollment: Limited to 15.                                       Tuesdays 5-7 p.m.
Steven C. Caton
Half course (spring term). Tu., 5–7 p.m. EXAM GROUP: 6
Focus in the Frankfurt School and such concepts as the culture industry, critical theory and research, art and mass media reproduction, negative dialective, public sphere, and other of its contributions to social and aesthetic theory.

Anthropology 2695. Design Anthropology: Objects, Landscapes, Cities

Catalog Number: 39129 Enrollment: Limited to 16.                                               Fridays 9-12
Gareth Gerard Doherty (Design School)
Half course (spring term). F. 9-12. EXAM GROUP: 17
This course will examine the intersections between design and anthropology. In recent years, there has been a movement in anthropology toward a focus on objects, while design, which has traditionally been concerned with objects, has been moving toward the understanding of objects as part of a greater milieu. This course explores the common ethnographic ground. No background in anthropology or design required.
Note: Offered jointly with the Graduate School of Design as GSD 3336.

Anthropology 2725. Anthropology and History

Catalog Number: 48056 Enrollment: Limited to 20.                                          Tuesdays 10-12
Ajantha Subramanian and Vincent Brown
Half course (spring term). Tu., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 12
Explores exchanges between the disciplines of History and Anthropology, emphasizing overlaps and distinctions in the treatment of mutual concerns such as the representation of time and space, the conceptualization of power, and the making of the subject.
Note: This course is also offered through the History Department as History 2725. Credit may be earned for either Anthropology 2725 or History 2725, but not both.

*Anthropology 2856. Biography, the Novel, Psychotherapy and Ethnography: Deep Ways of Knowing Persons in the Moral Context

Catalog Number: 8459                                                                                        Thursdays 2-4
Arthur Kleinman
Half course (spring term). Th., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 11
Compares deep ways of knowing the person in his/her cultural, political, economic and, most especially, moral context. Reads strong examples from each field to learn about individual and collective experience under uncertainty and danger.
Note: Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

Anthropology 2932. Anthropology of Governance - (New Course)

Catalog Number: 45335 Enrollment: Limited to 15.                                          Mondays 10-12
Susan Greenhalgh
Half course (spring term). M., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 5
This course examines the nature of governance in the contemporary era of corporate ascendance, widespread violence, shifting responsibilities for social welfare, and pervasive feelings of insecurity. It asks what configurations of actors – states, corporations, citizens, NGOs, transnational bodies, para-states – are trying to manage social life in different domains, devoting particular attention to the role of scientists and scientific logics in informng debate and practice. Drawing on recent ethnographies, we investigate key technologies of governance (statistics, audit, documents, policy) in the administration of such fields as health/disease, environment, urban planning, public health, and security. The course is designed to help students currently developing PhD projects incorporate an interest in governance through science into their dissertation projects.


Social Anthropology Cross-listed Courses

African and African American Studies 97. Sophomore Tutorial
Catalog Number: 3022 Enrollment: Limited to 30.                                                Tuesdays 1-3
Carla Denny Martin
Half course (spring term). Tu., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 1
This course will examine the complexity of contemporary racial and ethnic experience in the United States, focusing on self-identified "mixed-race" groups and voluntary immigrant groups from Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean (e.g. from Brazil, Cape Verde, Ethiopia, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Nigeria). Interdisciplinary course readings will introduce key theoretical issues in the social sciences and humanities, such as cultural relativism, the social construction of race, class, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, and the negotiation of identity in diaspora and minority settings. Assignments will include both written work and social engagement with local communities resulting in multimedia projects.
Note: Required for concentrators in African and African American Studies. Open to all undergraduates.

African and African American Studies 119x. Chocolate, Culture, and the Politics of Food

Catalog Number: 10526                                                                                 Mon. & Wed. 1-2
Carla Denny Martin
Half course (spring term). M., W., at 1, and a weekly section to be arranged. EXAM GROUP: 8
This course will examine the sociohistorical legacy of chocolate, with a delicious emphasis on the eating and appreciation of the so-called "food of the gods." Interdisciplinary course readings will introduce the history of cacao cultivation, the present day state of the global chocolate industry, the diverse cultural constructions surrounding chocolate, and the implications for chocolate’s future of scientific study, international politics, alternative trade models, and the food movement. Assignments will address pressing real world questions related to chocolate consumption, social justice, responsible development, honesty and the politics of representation in production and marketing, hierarchies of quality, and myths of purity.

African and African American Studies 209b. Africa Rising? New African Economies/Cultures and Their Global Implications

Catalog Number: 65212 Enrollment: Limited to 15.                   Mondays 12-1:30 and 6-7:30
George Paul Meiu
Half course (spring term). M., 12–1:30, M., 6–7:30 p.m. EXAM GROUP: 7
In a story titled Africa Rising (2011), The Economist argued that the continent epitomizes both the "transformative promise of [capitalist] growth" and its bleakest dimensions. This workshop will explore Africa’s changing place in the world - and the new economies, legalities, socialities, and cultural forms that have arisen there. It will also interrogate the claim that the African present is a foreshadowing of processes beginning to occur elsewhere; that, therefore, it is a productive source of theory about current conditions world-wide. The workshop, open to faculty and students, will meet Mondays, 6:00-7:30. 15 students will be permitted to take it as a course; they will also meet on Mondays, 12:00-1:30. Grades will be based on participation and a term essay.

History 2725. History and Anthropology: Seminar
Catalog Number: 26038 Enrollment: Limited to 20.                                          Tuesdays 10-12
Vincent Brown and Ajantha Subramanian
Half course (spring term). Tu., 10–12. EXAM GROUP: 12
Explores exchanges between the disciplines of History and Anthropology, emphasizing overlaps and distinctions in the treatment of mutual concerns such as the representation of time and space, the conceptualization of power, and the making of the subject.
Note: This course is also offered through the Anthropology Department as Anthropology 2725. Credit may be earned for either History 2725 or Anthropology 2725, but not both.

History of Science 136. History of Biotechnology
Catalog Number: 58601                                                                          Tues and Thur 10-11
Sophia Roosth
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 10. EXAM GROUP: 12
What becomes of life when researchers can materially manipulate and technically transform living things? In this course, we will historically investigate biotechnology in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, paying attention to how efforts to engineer life are grounded in social, cultural, and political contexts. Topics include reproductive technologies, genetic engineering and cloning, genetically modified foods, genomics, stem cells, intellectual property, and biosafety and biosecurity. The course is organized around five crosscutting domains in which we will explore the ethical, legal, and social impacts of biotechnology: (1) food, (2) property and law, (3) sex and reproduction, (4) disease and drugs, and (5) genomic identities. We will read and discuss historical accounts of biotechnology, primary scientific publications, and legal cases. We will learn to evaluate the social constitution and impact of biotechnology on daily life, as well as how to place contemporary issues and debates in biotechnology in historical context.

History of Science 164. Sense and Scientific Sensibility
Catalog Number: 35633                                                                                   Wednesdays 2-4
Sophia Roosth
Half course (spring term). W., 2–4. EXAM GROUP: 18
Scientific inquiry is often considered an endeavor pursued using one’s sense of vision: scientists peer into microscopes and telescopes, and stare at graphs, diagrams, and computer screens. But on what other senses do scientists rely? How do they gather data using senses of hearing, smell, taste, and touch (or, for that matter, less acknowledged perceptual systems, among them, balance, temperature, movement, pain, and time)? How do researchers evaluate sensory evidence? Further, what is the history of scientific studies of the senses? To address such questions, each week we will explore a different sense (from the canonical five to synaesthesia and ESP) by combining readings in the history of science with classic primary sources. Throughout, we will examine critical questions regarding how the senses are culturally and historically constructed, evaluated, and technologically mediated.

South Asian Studies 196. Capitalism and Cosmology in Modern India
Catalog Number: 63634                                                                                   Wednesdays 1-3
Shankar Ramaswami
Half course (spring term). W., 1–3. EXAM GROUP: 8
This course will explore the lives, politics, and cosmologies of working-class persons in modern India. The course will examine contemporary debates on globalization, development, and ecology; workers’ experiences of factory work, informality, and agitations; and workers’ religious practices, theologies, and cosmological visions. Core concerns of the course will include inquiries into the appropriate categories for understanding workers’ lives and visions, and the possibilities for autonomous, nonviolent politics among working people in India. The course will draw upon a range of sources, including anthropology, history, religious studies, epics, and Hindi cinema.
Note: Offered jointly with the Divinity School as 3529.






Department of Anthropology, Peabody Museum, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
©2012 President & Fellows of Harvard College